6 Tips to Master Home Appliance Repair

Sometimes you just gotta take matters into your own hands. Whether it’s because you want to develop your skills, or if you just want to save some extra money, DIY repair is a great choice. You will be able to extend the lifetime of your appliances considerably, and you won’t have to rely on unreliable repairmen who will charge you a fortune.

However, this is not an easy task. Without the proper training, you may be at risk of hurting yourself, or, at the very least, have the risk of making things worse. So, safety first, get some protective gear and read about our top six tips to master home appliance repair below.

Get the basics down

No matter how obvious or banal this piece of advice is, we still expect people to read it. Too many wannabe DIY repairmen end up getting hurt or just destroying their appliances because they didn’t start with the obvious. So, first of all, always unplug the appliance before you start working on it. Furthermore, once you’re done, keep an eye on the said appliance and make sure everything is going well. The last thing you need is to have your microwave catch fire while you’re on the other side of the room.

Next, actually check to see if there are any obvious problems before you start disassembling the entire thing. So, double check the power settings, or whether the thing is actually plugged in. Maybe the problem isn’t in the appliance, but in the outlet. Maybe there are some issues, like a simple filter being clogged. Or, on the other hand, maybe the appliance isn’t working due to a standard operational characteristic it has (like not working when placed on an uneven surface).

Check the moving parts

Moving parts tend to be the most likely culprit when it comes to home appliance repair. We suggest you start with them when you are repairing your appliance because of their tendency to wear and malfunction quickly. So, take a look at the fans and the motor of the appliance. You can often check this by the noise the appliance makes. Since you are fixing appliances that you yourself own, and have probably owned for a long time, you are probably accustomed to the noise they make. Anything different is a tell-tale sign of what’s actually wrong. Now, as far as fans and belts are concerned, get the right appliance spare parts at any specialized store, and get it done. On the other hand, motors are a bit more problematic and may require professional assistance.

Stick to the 50% rule

The 50% rule goes as follow: if your appliance is older than 50% of its expected lifespan, and if the cost of repairs and replacement parts is more than 50% of the price of buying a new one, you shouldn’t bother. The most financially sound decision here is to simply replace it. Of course, you can always disassemble it for your own enjoyment if you’re gonna replace it soon.

Get the right tools

Now, we are not saying you should buy the newest, most expensive and advanced toolkit on the market. But, you need to understand that often a screwdriver will not be enough. Something middle of the line will definitely be enough. Besides, if you want to continue with your DIY home repair efforts, you need a good toolkit anyway.

Now, one specific, important tool that you should get is a nice multimeter. One of the more annoying things when doing home repairs is that it’s hard to figure out if the problem can be found with the wiring. With a multimeter, you can measure voltage, and figure out which wires are ok, and which are not.

Check the ignition systems

For most gas-powered appliances, the most common problem is the ignition process. This goes for appliances that have electric starters and pilot lights as well, however. The point being is that stoves, for example, are very durable appliances that rarely break down completely. The most likely culprit tends to be their ignition system. So, we suggest you start there, check if there is any soot, or if the entire thing is properly aligned.

Check pipes and hoses

Dishwashers, washing machines, and basically any other water-based appliances depend on pipes and hoses to use water. The most likely culprit here tends to be these same hoses. We suggest you check them, and the surrounding valves, first when you want to repair appliances like these.

Conclusion

If you really want to get better at home appliance repair, we suggest you take the above advice to heart. Work on getting the basics down, get the right tools and stick to the 50% rule. Check your moving parts first, figure out where your hoses are, and get familiar with the ignition processes on your stoves.

Hydrogen Peroxide Uses

hydrogen-peroxideFirst Aid

Hydrogen peroxide gently sanitizes cuts and scrapes without harsh chemicals. It’s a natural anti-septic that helps to prevent infection. This solution should be used to help clean minor wounds but should not be used for long term treatment or to clean serious wounds.

I personally use a food-grade, 3% hydrogen peroxide solution for minor cuts, scrapes and bug bites to disinfect, and use this DIY first aid ointment to promote healing.

Contact Lens Solution

If you forgot your contact lens fluid, fear not! If you have hydrogen peroxide, you can use this as a temporary contact lens fluid. The 3% solution will keep your contact lenses safe and will even help break down proteins that have accumulated on your lenses during the day.

Sinus Infection Relief

Diluted hydrogen peroxide can be used as a nasal spray for those of you dealing with sinus congestion.

Mouthwash

A food-grade, 3% solution of hydrogen peroxide can be used as an effective and safe mouthwash. When used daily, it can even whiten your teeth and help with persistent canker sores. You only need about 1 tablespoon daily; just swish around the solution in your mouth for 1-2 minutes and then spit.

Sanitize Toothbrushes

Keep toothbrushes naturally clean with hydrogen peroxide. Just soak toothbrush heads with a 3% solution of hydrogen peroxide to kill germs and bacteria. Try this 1-2 times a week.

Whiten Teeth

Mix 1 tbsp of baking soda with 1 tsp of food-grade, 3% hydrogen peroxide to make a paste. Use this as a “toothpaste” to remove stains and help to whiten teeth. Use a few times a week as needed.

All-Purpose Cleaner

I always turn to hydrogen peroxide in my home because it is an effective and safe cleaning product. It has strongdisinfectant properties and so it can be used in the kitchen, bathroom and even on your children’s toys. It’s also great for cleaning mirrors and windows.

Laundry Stain Remover

Next time you have to tackle a laundry stain, try using 3% hydrogen peroxide. Gently dab the solution onto the stain and let sit for no longer than 3 minutes (hydrogen peroxide can bleach fabric if left on the stained surface too long), then thoroughly rinse the affected area.

Whiten Laundry

Give up bleach for good and opt for hydrogen peroxide to get clothes naturally white. Add 1 cup of hydrogen peroxide a load of laundry. Let soak for 20-30 minutes and wash as normal.

Mold and Mildew Cleaner

Don’t reach for bleach if you have a tough mold or mildew stain. Spray a 3% solution of hydrogen peroxide on mold and mildew on grout, tiles, bath tubs, shower stalls and more. Let solution soak for at least 30 minutes and rinse.

Carpet Cleaner

Got a tough carpet stain? Spray a little hydrogen peroxide on the stain and let sit for no longer than 3 minutes (hydrogen peroxide can bleach carpet if left on the stained surface too long), then wash out well with a cloth. Test on an inconspicuous spot first.

Disinfect Kitchen Sponges and Sinks

Kitchen sponges and sinks can easily contain more germs than bathroom toilets. Yuck!

Keep those sponges and kitchen sinks clean with hydrogen peroxide. Clean out sink of any dishes or dirt. Plug the sink and fill with very warm water and add 1/2 cup of hydrogen peroxide. Add kitchen sponges and let sit in sink for about 20-30 minutes. This will help to sanitize both the sponges and the sink and naturally kill bacteria.

Natural Fruit and Vegetable Cleaner

Hard to believe, but, yes, that produce you got from the store is covered in germs. Ew, right? Hydrogen peroxide can kill germs on your produce, as well as help neutralize potentially harmful chemicals.

Simply fill half of your sink with warm water and add 1⁄4 cup of food-grade, 3% hydrogen peroxide, then let your fruits and vegetables soak for 10-15 minutes. I would recommend using this method on fruits and vegetables with thicker skins such as cucumbers and potatoes.

Sanitize Cutting Boards

Keep your cutting boards clean with hydrogen peroxide. Just spray cutting board surfaces with hydrogen peroxide and let sit for 5 minutes. Rinse well with hot water, and then use dish soap to wash off food particles.

Disinfect Refrigerator

Got a funky smell in the fridge? First, empty out all the food and drinks. Then, spray hydrogen peroxide and let sit for a couple of minutes. It will help to sanitize and neutralize odors. Wipe down with a clean cloth and place food back inside.

Original article can be found at: http://wisemindhealthybody.com/tracey-black/hydrogen-peroxide-facts/

 

 

 

Christmas Refrigerator Makeover

432023_485600214803234_2095832864_nWhat an awesome idea to make over your fridge – and you could do this no matter what finish you have (stainless steel, black, white, almond). The eyes, nose, mouth and buttons are made from plain construction paper or you could use special papers with prints to give a different feel to it. The ‘ribbon’ is just a strip of wrapping paper but you could actually use a thick ribbon if you have one. Cheap and you can throw away when the year is done so no storage.

Spring Cleaning – The Kitchen

Walls and Appliances: When grease splatters or cake batter flies, you probably wipe it off in the moment, but you might not catch all of the grime that ends up covering your walls and appliances. Spring cleaning is the time to get rid of that caked-on dirt and grease. Spray all of your walls and appliances with an all-purpose cleaner and/or de-greaser and scrub them clean with a towel or sponge. Afterwards, rinse thoroughly to avoid leaving any sticky soap residue on the walls that could attract even more dirt and dust.

Kitchen Wall Hangings: This includes your kitchen clock and could extend to a hanging pot rack or even a spice rack or even a phone if you’ve got one mounted. Basically, anything that’s hanging on your walls or ceiling needs to come down for a thorough cleaning because nothing is safe from grease and dirt in the kitchen.

Oven: If you have a self-cleaning oven, run it now and wipe it down thoroughly when through (waiting several hours for the oven to cool down). One tip for self-cleaning ovens is to remove the temperature knobs because they tend to heat up and could melt. For regular ovens, follow your manufacturer’s instructions and/or the instructions on the oven cleaner you purchase. Always open any available windows and turn on vents when cleaning your oven to avoid fume contamination.

Refrigerator – Inside and Out: Throw out any expired food, empty jars, and other half-used products that are taking up space. Take out the refrigerator shelves and drawers. Wash them down, being careful with glass shelves. Wipe down the entire inside of the refrigerator and freezer before replacing shelves and food. Vacuum the coils of your unplugged refrigerator and wipe the outside completely, not forgetting the door handle (usually the filthiest part of the fridge!). If you can, ask someone to help you move the refrigerator to sweep and mop underneath it.

Stovetop:
Remove the knobs, burners, burner covers and spill catchers off the stovetop and either wash by hand or put into the dishwasher to clean and sanitize. Use a gentle abrasive and/or hot soapy water to thoroughly scrub the top of your stove. Use a crevice tool from your vacuum cleaner to remove crumbs or dirt from the cracks between your oven and the wall or counters.

Microwave: Wipe down and clean the microwave, washing the turntable by hand or putting it into the dishwasher. If the spills in the microwave are old or burnt in, boil a glass of water in the microwave. The steam should help loosen the crud. If the microwave smells, boil lemon juice to help freshen it up. Use glass cleaner on the outside surfaces and soapy water or all-purpose cleaner on the inside.

Kitchen Cabinets:Remove everything and wash the shelves, relining if necessary. Remove mismatched lids and bowls. Take out anything that isn’t being used on a regular basis. Reorganize and outsides of cabinets last.

Dishwasher:Try adding vinegar or baking soda to the empty dishwasher before running it. If your dishwasher has a food trap in the bottom, clean it out. Wash down the outside of the dishwasher.

Countertops: Don’t forget backsplashes.

Drawers: Remove everything and wipe the insides. This is a great time to tackle your “junk” drawer. If it’s really junk, throw it out. Remove utensils or cutlery that you don’t use and take the opportunity to re-organize and prioritize your kitchen items if you don’t feel they’re arranged in the most efficient manner possible.

Sink and Garbage Disposal: If you have a garbage disposal, now is the time to pour baking soda with warm water and/or a lemon peel down the disposal to freshen the drain. Put ice cubes through the disposal to sharpen the blades.

Here’s A Tip For You – Actually Several

1-Get a wonderful shine for your hair by rinsing it with cool water and vinegar. Don’t worry about the smell; it goes away quickly, leaving your hair shiny and lustrous.

2-If you have mineral deposits in a narrow neck jar vase, try using a denture tablet. Add a small amount of water to the vase and drop in the tablet, breaking it up as needed. Let it sit overnight or as the package recommends and rinse well.

3-To freshen old plastic flowers, spray with hairspray.

4-To get rid of static cling on a skirt and slip, just pin a small safety pin to the inside of the hem.

5-If your small appliance has a long cord, try looping it and stuffing the excess through a cardboard paper towel or toilet paper roll.

6-Protect teeth on hand saws by covering them up in storage. Cut a length of garden hose to  fit the length of the saw, then split it down one side. Push the teeth of the saw into the split – an added benefit is you are also protected.

7-Want to keep your refrigerator operating efficiently? Try these two small tricks: First, clean the gaskets on the door, and replace them if they are loose. If you close a dollar bill in the door and can pull it out easily it is time to replace the gaskets. Then, stock empty space with jars or pitchers of water. Cold water is refreshing and helps keep air in your fridge cold.