Make A Freezer Bag For Cooling Relief

This is great information to know. Make freeze bags cheaply so you can have several to always have one to use while others are getting ‘frozen’. Use these on sore muscles, injuries and to help keep cool when it is hot outside.

Christmas Refrigerator Makeover

432023_485600214803234_2095832864_nWhat an awesome idea to make over your fridge – and you could do this no matter what finish you have (stainless steel, black, white, almond). The eyes, nose, mouth and buttons are made from plain construction paper or you could use special papers with prints to give a different feel to it. The ‘ribbon’ is just a strip of wrapping paper but you could actually use a thick ribbon if you have one. Cheap and you can throw away when the year is done so no storage.

Home Made Ice Pack

936571_196232707200470_1954803542_nThis is a simple way to make ice packs for the freezer that will never harden but gets very very cold. It is the simple formula of 3 part water to 1 part rubbing alcohol. In a gallon bag you would put 1 cup rubbing alcohol to three cups water in a quart bag you would add 1/2 cup rubbing alcohol to 1 1/2 cups water. Double bag! When you use it for one application wash the outside bag or remove and replace it so it is always cold. The rubbing alcohol will keep the water from freezing which makes this ice pack palatable to mold over your body. Keep more than one in the freezer so you can alternate. Replace water/alcohol mixture minimally once a year.

6 Things You Can Freeze

1. EGGS Lightly beaten eggs, beaten yolks, or whites can be frozen, but not an egg in its shell. Store in lidded ice cube trays. (One egg fills two cubes.)
2. COOKED RICE Spread cooled rice on a lined baking sheet Rub with a small amount of vegetable oil so grains separate. Freeze, then transfer to a freezer bag.
3. GINGER ROOT Wrap peeled ginger in plastic, then put in freezer bag. Ginger grates well while still frozen.
4. CHEESE Cut hard (Parmesan, pecorino) and semi-hard cheeses (cheddar, Swiss) into ix4-inch blocks, wrap in plastic, then put in a freezer bag. Grate hard cheeses while frozen; thaw others in the refrigerator.
5. BUTTER or MARGARINE Store in a freezer bag, in its original packaging, for up to six months. Thaw in the refrigerator. Dont freeze whipped butter.
6. NUTS Store in airtight container or freezer bag for up to six weeks. Use right from the freezer for recipes—no need to thaw.

 

 

Spring Cleaning – The Kitchen

Walls and Appliances: When grease splatters or cake batter flies, you probably wipe it off in the moment, but you might not catch all of the grime that ends up covering your walls and appliances. Spring cleaning is the time to get rid of that caked-on dirt and grease. Spray all of your walls and appliances with an all-purpose cleaner and/or de-greaser and scrub them clean with a towel or sponge. Afterwards, rinse thoroughly to avoid leaving any sticky soap residue on the walls that could attract even more dirt and dust.

Kitchen Wall Hangings: This includes your kitchen clock and could extend to a hanging pot rack or even a spice rack or even a phone if you’ve got one mounted. Basically, anything that’s hanging on your walls or ceiling needs to come down for a thorough cleaning because nothing is safe from grease and dirt in the kitchen.

Oven: If you have a self-cleaning oven, run it now and wipe it down thoroughly when through (waiting several hours for the oven to cool down). One tip for self-cleaning ovens is to remove the temperature knobs because they tend to heat up and could melt. For regular ovens, follow your manufacturer’s instructions and/or the instructions on the oven cleaner you purchase. Always open any available windows and turn on vents when cleaning your oven to avoid fume contamination.

Refrigerator – Inside and Out: Throw out any expired food, empty jars, and other half-used products that are taking up space. Take out the refrigerator shelves and drawers. Wash them down, being careful with glass shelves. Wipe down the entire inside of the refrigerator and freezer before replacing shelves and food. Vacuum the coils of your unplugged refrigerator and wipe the outside completely, not forgetting the door handle (usually the filthiest part of the fridge!). If you can, ask someone to help you move the refrigerator to sweep and mop underneath it.

Stovetop:
Remove the knobs, burners, burner covers and spill catchers off the stovetop and either wash by hand or put into the dishwasher to clean and sanitize. Use a gentle abrasive and/or hot soapy water to thoroughly scrub the top of your stove. Use a crevice tool from your vacuum cleaner to remove crumbs or dirt from the cracks between your oven and the wall or counters.

Microwave: Wipe down and clean the microwave, washing the turntable by hand or putting it into the dishwasher. If the spills in the microwave are old or burnt in, boil a glass of water in the microwave. The steam should help loosen the crud. If the microwave smells, boil lemon juice to help freshen it up. Use glass cleaner on the outside surfaces and soapy water or all-purpose cleaner on the inside.

Kitchen Cabinets:Remove everything and wash the shelves, relining if necessary. Remove mismatched lids and bowls. Take out anything that isn’t being used on a regular basis. Reorganize and outsides of cabinets last.

Dishwasher:Try adding vinegar or baking soda to the empty dishwasher before running it. If your dishwasher has a food trap in the bottom, clean it out. Wash down the outside of the dishwasher.

Countertops: Don’t forget backsplashes.

Drawers: Remove everything and wipe the insides. This is a great time to tackle your “junk” drawer. If it’s really junk, throw it out. Remove utensils or cutlery that you don’t use and take the opportunity to re-organize and prioritize your kitchen items if you don’t feel they’re arranged in the most efficient manner possible.

Sink and Garbage Disposal: If you have a garbage disposal, now is the time to pour baking soda with warm water and/or a lemon peel down the disposal to freshen the drain. Put ice cubes through the disposal to sharpen the blades.