A Guide to Moving to the South

So you’re thinking of making the leap. Your dream of pulling up stakes and heading way down south to Dixie is starting to feel less like a pipe dream and more like a real possibility.

And, if you’ve got southern skies on your mind, you’re not alone. In fact, in 2018, more than one million Americans moved to the south, with Florida and Texas topping the list of new transplants, especially from major metropolitan areas like New York City and Chicago.

It’s really not hard to see why. When it comes to the south, there’s a whole lot to love. But southern living isn’t likely to look much like a Designing Women episode. Your own southern saga will probably be nothing like a Tennessee Williams play.

But when you separate fact from fiction, you’ll find the south, with its beautiful landscapes, thriving economy, and vibrant cultures, to be a region unlike any other. Here’s what you should know before you embark on your own Dixie destiny.

The Weather: Good, Bad, and Ugly

Yes, in most cases, southern weather really does live up to the hype. If you’re a snow bunny, or if you have some particular affinity for shoveling your body weight in snow in subzero temperatures, then southern living may not be for you.

But living below the Mason-Dixon line doesn’t necessarily mean renouncing snow altogether. Some areas, especially in the Appalachian mountains of the mid-south, such as in Tennessee and North Carolina, still get fairly substantial amounts of snow each winter — just nothing like the paralyzing snows of the great white north. Even when you head further south, you can still expect to get at least a taste of snow each winter — just enough to be charming, to satisfy the winter itch, before you go back to savoring the mild temperatures of late January.

Unfortunately, though, there are some drawbacks to the south’s storied weather. Summers are hot. Really hot. And humid. Really humid. And unless you’re trying to clear your karma of some unspeakable sin, you better make sure you have great air conditioning.

But that’s not all. Because you also need to be prepared for the temperamentality of weather in the south, which is as changeful as a young girl’s fancies (and if you’re moving to the south, you better get used to colorful phrasing with lots of metaphors while you’re at it). A pristine summer day and a cloudless azure sky can easily give way within a matter of minutes to a monsoon-like rain or, worse, a powerful tornado.

So no matter where you go or what the forecasts may say, when you live southerly, you must be prepared for any weather — and to take these southern storms seriously.  

More Bang for Your Buck

One of the best things about living in the south is that you’re going to have a lot of professional opportunities combined with a lower cost of living than you would find in other parts of the US. In fact, the south is an unlikely — but rapidly growing — hotspot in the tech industry.

So when you’re preparing to relocate, make sure you give that resume a good going over. As more and more northerners flock to the south, you’re going to face more significant competition, even in the region’s lively job market. Nevertheless, punching up your resume to showcase the skills that only you can offer is the perfect way to land your dream job under these warm southern skies.

And once you’ve landed that dream job, you might well capitalize on the lower cost of living to build your own dream home. While the cost of surveying and clearing land for building may be significant, you’re likely to find it’s worth every penny to land your own piece of prime southern real estate. Depending on where you move in the south, you can pretty much have your choice of landscape, from oceanfront to lakeside, from mountainscape to valley view. Wherever you end up settling down, just be prepared for company, and lots of it.

Southern Hospitality is Real

There’s much to love about the south. But perhaps the best thing is the culture. Its history. Its hospitality. Its food. Its music.

The simple truth is that the south is a beautiful land with beautiful people. You will eat better, laugh more, and feel more welcome than perhaps you ever have in your life.

Because, when you come down to it, the south is far more than a place. It’s a feeling, a way of life. And once you’ve had a taste of southern living, you can never go back. No matter where life may take you, you will carry the south with you in your heart, bones, and blood.

The Takeaway

The south isn’t a region. It’s a state of mind. But if you’re thinking of moving down home, there are some things you should know about this extraordinary place, with its flourishing economy, rich culture, and profound sense of community. So do your homework and then come on down. We’ll be proud to welcome you!

Hit The Head Of The Nail And Not Your Finger

Ok, I am guilty. I have hit my thump or finger multiple times over the years. Ouch, right? Here is a simple solution to make sure that does not happen again. This is a simple hair clip and they are dirt cheap. A dollar store has them for like twenty for a dollar. A great little cheap accessory for your toolbox.

My Cluttered Life – Part 1

It has come to a time in my life that I have had an epiphany to the fact I hate clutter. I hate to move it around, to look for certain items and I certainly hate it to move from one place to another. I have started a quest to rid my life of excess. Don’t get me wrong I do like my stuff, but there has to be a line drawn in the sand.

So I am going to start writing a series of articles about clutter and for some of us hoarding. I will also talk about purging and cleaning and freeing yourself of the burdens ‘stuff’ brings to your life. You can follow these articles under the category ‘My Cluttered Life’ on the side panel of this blog. I will write every now and then. Some will be short and sweet with tips and tricks. Some will be an accounting of my goals and I want you to use them to help make your life a bit more free.

So, I just moved. Not far away but we moved from a temporary townhouse into a house so everything is now in one place. We moved from Rio Rancho, NM to West Jordan, UT (think Albuquerque to Salt Lake City areas). We moved from a house to a townhouse until we got established and figured out exactly where we wanted to live and where work would be. It took us two years. Yes, that temporary housing didn’t end up being so temporary. That caused a problem.

When I moved up here thinking it was a temporary move I packed accordingly. I packed stuff for a storage unit and packed stuff to live with for a few months. I figured I would keep things to a minimum that we were living with and I would handle it. So, most of everything went into storage. But when you live in a home for two years you need stuff (Yes, that temporary thin ended up to be two years). So, instead of digging through a three car garage packed very tight we just bought new. Now everything is in one place we have duplicates and lots of them.

This was the first step to make in my series of articles I am writing. I do not need two of most items. So out went ten good sized boxes that were just literally picked up by Big Brothers Big Sisters. It feels good to pass on items that were perfectly good to someone who could use it while it benefiting a worthwhile charity and in turn freeing up space in my home. I am sure I will find more duplicates as I move through the house but that is alright. I can make another large load to donate or take a box at a time to a local thrift store.

My strategy now is to go to one tote to another. Discard things that are no longer in working condition, broken or just not wanted anymore. I am also using labeled totes to put things that are ‘I don’t knows’. When I am done going through the house I will take one of these totes at a time and everything in the tote will find a home in my home or it will go to the trash or donate. Will write another article on the flip side of doing this. See you all then.

5 Actionable Steps to Get Online Quickly When Moving Home

Internet connection is a necessity in the modern age. Some people use internet in lieu of other services, cutting the cable and streaming their favorite TV shows. Many households rely on the internet for their accounting and paying the bills. The idea of being stuck in a new home without an internet connection likely doesn’t sit well. Here’s what you can do to avoid that frustration and get online as quickly as possible after moving home.

  1. See Who Services Your New Area

Your current provider may not offer service in your new area. Some internet companies have more infrastructure in certain areas, making it difficult for smaller or newer providers to find their footing. Before moving, be sure to check your current provider’s coverage areas. If you can use the same provider, things will likely be easier. If not, you’ll have to determine which available provider offers the best service in your new neighborhood. Checking all the internet providers in your new area before you actually pack and move will save you a lot of stress. Don’t forget to do it.

  1. Transfer Your Existing Service if Possible

If your current provider serves your new neighborhood, you can begin to process of transferring the service. Service availability might mean you need to switch your plan with your provider. If they offer better coverage near your new home, that’s great. You can improve the quality of your service. If they play a limited role in the new market, you might have to settle for something less than what you previously had. A representative for your internet company will let you know what they can do for you.

Be sure to given them enough notice. As soon as you know your move-in date, let your internet service provider know. Although you shouldn’t count on it, some providers might be able to accommodate a last-minute move. They’ll typically attempt to schedule installation as soon as possible, but they might not be able to get you online right away if they only have a few days’ notice.

  1. Review Your Current Contract

Since internet is a monthly service, it typically comes with a contract. Very few internet service providers offer month-to-month service without one. If your provider utilizes contracts, be sure to review the one you’ve signed. Some providers require you to make a commitment to use their service for a prolonged period of time in exchange for a lower rate or sign-up special. If you’re going with a different provider after you move, there many be penalties for discontinuing your service before your contract runs out.

  1. Negotiate If You’re Using a New Provider

New providers are eager to pick up business. If there’s a cancellation penalty for leaving your old provider, your new one might be willing to pay the fees on your behalf in exchange for a lengthy commitment with them.

Even if you’re not dealing with any cancellation penalties, you still may be able to negotiate. Many providers are eager to outshine their competitors. You might be able to score a lower monthly rate if you ask around. Some providers will lower their asking price or add more value to a bundle package, like including home phone or increasing maximum speeds. Don’t accept the sticker price if you don’t have to – a little negotiation now can save you a lot of money over time.

  1. Plan Ahead for Installation

Some providers will give customers a quick install kit. They can hook up their own internet connection in a matter of a few minutes if the home is already equipped with the necessary co-ax cables and necessary infrastructure for connection. If you don’t want to install the internet yourself or if more extensive work needs to be done, prepare for your installer by picking an ideal spot for the equipment and a nearby electrical outlet.

Once your internet is installed, make sure you receive the necessary documents with your passwords and important equipment information. You may also want to test your internet speed to assure you’re getting the rate you were promised. If everything checks out, you’re good to go.

As long as you’re treating internet connection as an important priority and thinking ahead, you’ll be back to normal browsing in no time. Just make sure to log off once in a while to enjoy your new home.

Bio:

Ariana Williams is a pedagogy graduate with a huge love for teaching children. She is also an avid writer and, whenever not spending time with her family, she enjoys writing for blogs and newspaper from her quiet apartment. Feel free to visit Ariana on @AriWilliamsAri and say “hi”.

How To Survive A Last-Minute House Move: 5 Easy-To-Follow Steps

A house move usually requires at least two months of planning and preparation to ensure that everything is dealt with accordingly. Unfortunately, there are some instances where a quick, last-minute relocation cannot be avoided.

While it may seem more daunting to tackle compared to a thoroughly planned move, you can still succeed in the task without too much stress. The key is to know the different parts of the process and the most efficient way of completing them.

To help you out, here are five easy-to-follow steps you can use as a guide to surviving that last-minute relocation:

Step #1: Choose a Removal Company

Removal companies are experts when it comes to dealing with the logistics of a move. They can handle almost everything — from packing and transporting your belongings to helping with the unpacking at your new residence.

Because their role in the success of the relocation is huge, it is imperative that you hire the best in the business who can accommodate a rushed move. When choosing a removal company in Sydney, Australia or in any other location in the world, you should do a good amount of research and ask the right questions.

Some of the things you must learn are the cost, the type of services you require, and the standard fees so you’ll know if you’re getting the most out of your money.

Step #2: Pack an Essentials Bag

An essentials bag should contain all the necessary items that you may need on your first couple of days in your new place. This way, you won’t have to rush with the unpacking and it will help you to stay organized after your move.

Here are some of the things you need to include in your essentials pack:

  • Chargers
  • Keys
  • First-aid kit complete with all necessary maintenance medications
  • Beddings, such as pillows, blankets, and bed sheets
  • Toiletries
  • A few changes of clothes
  • Paper towels, toilet paper, and other essential paper supplies
  • Cleaning supplies
  • Flashlight
  • Meal staples and easy-cook (or no-cook) food
  • Water and other replenishments
  • Kitchen utensils and dishes
  • Coffee or tea
  • Portable tool kit and scissors
  • Identification documents and other important papers
  • Cash and/or credit cards

Step #3: Pack the Rest of Your Belongings

Now that you’re done with your essentials, it is time to proceed to the rest of your belongings. Since you’re short on time, you may need all the help you can get to complete this. This means you should also consider hiring experts to complete the packing faster.

It is also wise to follow these time-saving tips:

  1. Sort them later. If you don’t have enough time to pack, it would be wiser to sort your items during the unpacking. You can skip labeling and segregating items according to a “theme,” but never forgo the “fragile” stickers to avoid the mishandling of your breakables.
  2. Use socks and towels to protect fragile items from damage. Since time is limited, it’s likely that you have no time to shop for bubble wrap and packing peanuts. Instead, you can use soft items like clothing, towels, and even bedding to wrap stemware and other breakable items. Newspapers can work too, but be wary of the ink.
  3. Only set up boxes when you need them. Packing for a last-minute move means you need all the space you have in a room, which is why you should only set up boxes when you’re ready to put things in them.
  4. Don’t remove clothes from their hangers. When packing for a rushed relocation, it would be better to put plastic bags over your clothes while they are still in their hangers. This will also make unpacking them easier later.

Step #4: Hire Professionals for the Cleaning

It is a good idea to have your old home deep cleaned first before you move out. If you were renting, it is likely that this is necessary for you to get your deposit or bond back. You could also leave the cleaning of your new place to the professionals to ensure that it gets done before you arrive.

Step #5: Think About Storage

If you have too many items that you cannot let go of, but you cannot take everything with you on the move, it may be time to consider hiring storage solutions. This way, the stored items will remain in your possession and you can make arrangements later for having them taken out of the storage facility and transported to your new home, if needed.

Talk to your trusted removals company as they may also offer flexible short-term or long-term storage solutions.

Ready, Set, Move!

A last-minute relocation doesn’t need to be daunting. When preparing for a rushed move, it is important that you know the most important things that need to be accomplished to make it work. This way, you can avoid missing important steps and your relocation can be a success.

AUTHOR BIO

Robert Wise, Sales Administration Manager at Nuss Removals, has been a respected figure in the removals industry for over 20 years. His attention to detail and the ability to truly understand the needs of the customer have ensured the successful relocation of thousands of satisfied individuals and families. For moving and storage across Australia and around the world, Robert’s wealth of experience ensures his customers are in safe hands.