Food Preservation Help

1. Cheese

Save cheese from drying out and getting moldy, by making your own brine. Into two cups of water dissolve two teaspoons of kosher salt. Stir until the salt dissolves.

Make sure the cheese is completely covered by the brine. If the cheese is already quite salty, you can submerge it in plain water. Store in a closed container in the fridge.

2. Store Garlic

Like those vampires it is reported to scare off, garlic hates light and moisture. To avoid moldy garlic, store it in a dry dark place at room temperature. A great way to do this is to place it in a paper bag punched with holes to keep air circulating. You can also store garlic in the cupboard on a wire-mesh basket. You can safely store garlic like this for up to 6 months.

3. Keep Onions Fresh

Onions can be harvested and stored over the winter. They need to be kept dry and aerated. First, you need to cure them. Spread the onions out in a single layer in a warm airy spot. Once they are dry, trim the roots with scissors. Store dried onions in mesh bags. An easy and inexpensive way to do this is to place them in a clean pair of pantyhose and hang them handy for use.

4. Leftover Tomato Paste

If you have any leftover tomato paste, place it on a baking sheet. Depending on how much you use per meal, you can make a different number of portions. Then roll each portion as a candy, put all your “candies” in a Ziploc bag, and put it in the freezer. You will be able to use it for up to 5 months.

5. Bug-Free Dry Goods

Did you know that a bay leaf will deter insects from making your flour supply their home? Beetles, weevils, moths, cockroaches, ants, and flies do not like the smell of bay leaves. Place dried bay leaves in the containers of your dry goods. It works for flour, rice, and pasta. You can also tape fresh or dried bay leaves inside your cupboards and shelves.

6. Freeze Everything That Can Be Frozen

Fruits, vegetables, and fresh herbs can all be frozen and used in the offseason.

Whether you have your own garden or you are buying more of these when in season, freezing them is an excellent way to save money and have fresh foods in the offseason. To freeze fresh herbs, chop and create green ice cubes. These can be popped into soups, stews, and sauces.

7. Wilted Herbs

Place your wilted herbs on a baking tray in the oven for a few minutes. Once they are done, place the herbs in a sealed jar and use them each time you need them.

8. Fresh for longer

Ginger, green onions, and radishes will keep longer and will stay fresh if stored in a sealed container, filled with water.

9. Keep your fruits fresh

Add 3 parts water to 1-part vinegar. Wash your berries in this mixture, dry them and then refrigerate. Strawberries, blueberries, and blackberries will last longer and won’t go moldy.

10. Fresh bread for longer

Put a celery stick inside your bag of bread. Your bread won’t get moldy for more than one week.

11. Milk

Put a pinch of table salt in your milk jug and store it in the freezer. The salt will stop your milk from getting spoiled.

12. Bananas

By wrapping the stems of your bananas in a plastic wrap, they will brown much more slowly.

13. Green salad

Store your green salad in a kitchen towel. Put it in a closed container and store it in the freezer. The towel will absorb moisture and your salad will stay fresh for longer.

14. Smart Saucer

You can make a nutritious sauce for pasta with your blender or food processor. Freeze it and it’s ready when you need it. This is a great way to preserve extra tomatoes in season.

15. Try Your Hand at Dehydrating

Here’s another great idea! New dehydrators have several shelves. So, you can dehydrate several foods at once – as long as they have the same dehydration time. The secret’s in the preparation and knowing how long to dehydrate. Most foods can be dehydrated.

16. Get Creative with Appliances

Want to try drying before you purchase a dehydrator? Try these ideas: Use your oven as a dehydrator. Preheat the oven to 145 degrees. Fruits and veggies will turn out crisp and tasty. Dehydrate meat to make jerky at 150 degrees. Use parchment paper for fruit leather recipes.

Try six to eight hours or increase the temperature and dry a shorter time. Make use of your toaster oven as a dehydrator. Set your toaster oven to as low as it will go. Leave the door slightly ajar. Check often.

17. Use the Old Sun Dry Method

Sun-drying has been around for generations. It is time-consuming but easy and cost-effective. Set food in trays on parchment paper in the sun. This drying process can take several days. Cover with mesh to keep insects and flies away.

Stone Garden Markers For Herbs & Vegetables

16ac9cd3-cbfb-497b-b44c-cc0266f475e7Find smooth rocks and paint with acrylic paint. Write names of seedlings and herbs to avoid confusion. Cover in three coats of polyurethane to keep name on.

Hydrogen Peroxide Uses

hydrogen-peroxideFirst Aid

Hydrogen peroxide gently sanitizes cuts and scrapes without harsh chemicals. It’s a natural anti-septic that helps to prevent infection. This solution should be used to help clean minor wounds but should not be used for long term treatment or to clean serious wounds.

I personally use a food-grade, 3% hydrogen peroxide solution for minor cuts, scrapes and bug bites to disinfect, and use this DIY first aid ointment to promote healing.

Contact Lens Solution

If you forgot your contact lens fluid, fear not! If you have hydrogen peroxide, you can use this as a temporary contact lens fluid. The 3% solution will keep your contact lenses safe and will even help break down proteins that have accumulated on your lenses during the day.

Sinus Infection Relief

Diluted hydrogen peroxide can be used as a nasal spray for those of you dealing with sinus congestion.

Mouthwash

A food-grade, 3% solution of hydrogen peroxide can be used as an effective and safe mouthwash. When used daily, it can even whiten your teeth and help with persistent canker sores. You only need about 1 tablespoon daily; just swish around the solution in your mouth for 1-2 minutes and then spit.

Sanitize Toothbrushes

Keep toothbrushes naturally clean with hydrogen peroxide. Just soak toothbrush heads with a 3% solution of hydrogen peroxide to kill germs and bacteria. Try this 1-2 times a week.

Whiten Teeth

Mix 1 tbsp of baking soda with 1 tsp of food-grade, 3% hydrogen peroxide to make a paste. Use this as a “toothpaste” to remove stains and help to whiten teeth. Use a few times a week as needed.

All-Purpose Cleaner

I always turn to hydrogen peroxide in my home because it is an effective and safe cleaning product. It has strongdisinfectant properties and so it can be used in the kitchen, bathroom and even on your children’s toys. It’s also great for cleaning mirrors and windows.

Laundry Stain Remover

Next time you have to tackle a laundry stain, try using 3% hydrogen peroxide. Gently dab the solution onto the stain and let sit for no longer than 3 minutes (hydrogen peroxide can bleach fabric if left on the stained surface too long), then thoroughly rinse the affected area.

Whiten Laundry

Give up bleach for good and opt for hydrogen peroxide to get clothes naturally white. Add 1 cup of hydrogen peroxide a load of laundry. Let soak for 20-30 minutes and wash as normal.

Mold and Mildew Cleaner

Don’t reach for bleach if you have a tough mold or mildew stain. Spray a 3% solution of hydrogen peroxide on mold and mildew on grout, tiles, bath tubs, shower stalls and more. Let solution soak for at least 30 minutes and rinse.

Carpet Cleaner

Got a tough carpet stain? Spray a little hydrogen peroxide on the stain and let sit for no longer than 3 minutes (hydrogen peroxide can bleach carpet if left on the stained surface too long), then wash out well with a cloth. Test on an inconspicuous spot first.

Disinfect Kitchen Sponges and Sinks

Kitchen sponges and sinks can easily contain more germs than bathroom toilets. Yuck!

Keep those sponges and kitchen sinks clean with hydrogen peroxide. Clean out sink of any dishes or dirt. Plug the sink and fill with very warm water and add 1/2 cup of hydrogen peroxide. Add kitchen sponges and let sit in sink for about 20-30 minutes. This will help to sanitize both the sponges and the sink and naturally kill bacteria.

Natural Fruit and Vegetable Cleaner

Hard to believe, but, yes, that produce you got from the store is covered in germs. Ew, right? Hydrogen peroxide can kill germs on your produce, as well as help neutralize potentially harmful chemicals.

Simply fill half of your sink with warm water and add 1⁄4 cup of food-grade, 3% hydrogen peroxide, then let your fruits and vegetables soak for 10-15 minutes. I would recommend using this method on fruits and vegetables with thicker skins such as cucumbers and potatoes.

Sanitize Cutting Boards

Keep your cutting boards clean with hydrogen peroxide. Just spray cutting board surfaces with hydrogen peroxide and let sit for 5 minutes. Rinse well with hot water, and then use dish soap to wash off food particles.

Disinfect Refrigerator

Got a funky smell in the fridge? First, empty out all the food and drinks. Then, spray hydrogen peroxide and let sit for a couple of minutes. It will help to sanitize and neutralize odors. Wipe down with a clean cloth and place food back inside.

Original article can be found at: http://wisemindhealthybody.com/tracey-black/hydrogen-peroxide-facts/

 

 

 

Foods To Eat That Are Good For Your Health

418737_145046702315633_574706780_nThese are some simple foods that you can incorporate into your diet to help with things like breast cancer, heart disease, wrinkles, cancer and cholesterol. Some you already probably incorporate into your diet already but it is important to understand that the more raw and less cooked you eat them in is the healthiest for you and will help with the above conditions better. For instance, raw vegetables are best – but if you must cook steaming is the best way to cook, followed by blanching, boiling and placing into foil and baking are the best options. Nuts should never be purchased in snack isle or near registers – only get them in the baking isle. These can be found cooked or raw (some nuts are not edible in raw form) but they will not have added sodium and are much healthier for you. One final note is about frozen berries and vegetables – there is not a lot of difference in frozen berries and vegetables because mostly they are flash frozen which will allow them to retain their good properties. Just remember to look for things like added sugar or sodium (like that bag of frozen corn saturated with butter and salt that you throw into a microwave and serve right from the bag).