Hydrogen Peroxide Uses

hydrogen-peroxideFirst Aid

Hydrogen peroxide gently sanitizes cuts and scrapes without harsh chemicals. It’s a natural anti-septic that helps to prevent infection. This solution should be used to help clean minor wounds but should not be used for long term treatment or to clean serious wounds.

I personally use a food-grade, 3% hydrogen peroxide solution for minor cuts, scrapes and bug bites to disinfect, and use this DIY first aid ointment to promote healing.

Contact Lens Solution

If you forgot your contact lens fluid, fear not! If you have hydrogen peroxide, you can use this as a temporary contact lens fluid. The 3% solution will keep your contact lenses safe and will even help break down proteins that have accumulated on your lenses during the day.

Sinus Infection Relief

Diluted hydrogen peroxide can be used as a nasal spray for those of you dealing with sinus congestion.

Mouthwash

A food-grade, 3% solution of hydrogen peroxide can be used as an effective and safe mouthwash. When used daily, it can even whiten your teeth and help with persistent canker sores. You only need about 1 tablespoon daily; just swish around the solution in your mouth for 1-2 minutes and then spit.

Sanitize Toothbrushes

Keep toothbrushes naturally clean with hydrogen peroxide. Just soak toothbrush heads with a 3% solution of hydrogen peroxide to kill germs and bacteria. Try this 1-2 times a week.

Whiten Teeth

Mix 1 tbsp of baking soda with 1 tsp of food-grade, 3% hydrogen peroxide to make a paste. Use this as a “toothpaste” to remove stains and help to whiten teeth. Use a few times a week as needed.

All-Purpose Cleaner

I always turn to hydrogen peroxide in my home because it is an effective and safe cleaning product. It has strongdisinfectant properties and so it can be used in the kitchen, bathroom and even on your children’s toys. It’s also great for cleaning mirrors and windows.

Laundry Stain Remover

Next time you have to tackle a laundry stain, try using 3% hydrogen peroxide. Gently dab the solution onto the stain and let sit for no longer than 3 minutes (hydrogen peroxide can bleach fabric if left on the stained surface too long), then thoroughly rinse the affected area.

Whiten Laundry

Give up bleach for good and opt for hydrogen peroxide to get clothes naturally white. Add 1 cup of hydrogen peroxide a load of laundry. Let soak for 20-30 minutes and wash as normal.

Mold and Mildew Cleaner

Don’t reach for bleach if you have a tough mold or mildew stain. Spray a 3% solution of hydrogen peroxide on mold and mildew on grout, tiles, bath tubs, shower stalls and more. Let solution soak for at least 30 minutes and rinse.

Carpet Cleaner

Got a tough carpet stain? Spray a little hydrogen peroxide on the stain and let sit for no longer than 3 minutes (hydrogen peroxide can bleach carpet if left on the stained surface too long), then wash out well with a cloth. Test on an inconspicuous spot first.

Disinfect Kitchen Sponges and Sinks

Kitchen sponges and sinks can easily contain more germs than bathroom toilets. Yuck!

Keep those sponges and kitchen sinks clean with hydrogen peroxide. Clean out sink of any dishes or dirt. Plug the sink and fill with very warm water and add 1/2 cup of hydrogen peroxide. Add kitchen sponges and let sit in sink for about 20-30 minutes. This will help to sanitize both the sponges and the sink and naturally kill bacteria.

Natural Fruit and Vegetable Cleaner

Hard to believe, but, yes, that produce you got from the store is covered in germs. Ew, right? Hydrogen peroxide can kill germs on your produce, as well as help neutralize potentially harmful chemicals.

Simply fill half of your sink with warm water and add 1⁄4 cup of food-grade, 3% hydrogen peroxide, then let your fruits and vegetables soak for 10-15 minutes. I would recommend using this method on fruits and vegetables with thicker skins such as cucumbers and potatoes.

Sanitize Cutting Boards

Keep your cutting boards clean with hydrogen peroxide. Just spray cutting board surfaces with hydrogen peroxide and let sit for 5 minutes. Rinse well with hot water, and then use dish soap to wash off food particles.

Disinfect Refrigerator

Got a funky smell in the fridge? First, empty out all the food and drinks. Then, spray hydrogen peroxide and let sit for a couple of minutes. It will help to sanitize and neutralize odors. Wipe down with a clean cloth and place food back inside.

Original article can be found at: http://wisemindhealthybody.com/tracey-black/hydrogen-peroxide-facts/

 

 

 

Ever Wondered Just How Old Or Fresh Your Eggs Are?

51d89e23-ce33-406d-a796-c34fc1d3beaa.jpeg;base64Very interesting chart to show you just how fresh your eggs are. A lot of people don’t care other then to know if the egg should still be used because of age. Did you know that there is a change in how the egg tastes and cooks depending on how fresh it is? For some bakers only the freshest of eggs will work because they swear that the freshest of eggs makes cakes more airy and are more consistent when baking goodies like cookies and other treats. Depending on how you like your eggs fried you may want freshest (fluffy) or older (for a denser consistency). However, you should always toss eggs that float because they are considered bad and may be unhealthy to eat. Print this out and keep it in your recipe book or tape it on the inside of a cabinet in your kitchen for reference.

Dish Washing Tip

Ever have a dish or two in the sink that you want to wash? Don’t wait for more dirty dishes before you hand wash or keep the faucet running or fill a sink with soap and water for a couple of dishes. Keep a spray bottle filled with water and add a bit of dish washing liquid next to your sink. Spritz dishes to loosen food and to use less dish soap and water. Works great on counters, too. The first tip has another suggestion for washing glasses.

Spring Cleaning – The Bathroom

Shower and Tub: Scrub as you normally do, this time also removing your shower curtain to launder or use a heavy duty soap scum remover to get the grime off of shower doors.

Toilet: Get into all of those nooks and crannies, and that includes the parts that no one sees behind the porcelain throne and underneath.

Medicine Cabinet: Remove everything from your medicine cabinet and any other cupboards or cabinets you use to store bathroom products and thoroughly clean all surfaces. You’ll be surprised at how much soapy residue or old shampoo – or just plain dust – has accumulated in there. This is a great time to throw stuff out- and don’t be bashful! If you feel bad about throwing away half-full cosmetics or shampoos, put them in a yard sale. People will buy them.

Sinks and Mirrors: Follow your usual routine, but this time, add q-tips to your arsenal to really get into each crevice of your mirror and bathroom fixtures.

Bathroom Trash Can: Can liners only can do so much from keeping dirt and germs from the surface of your trash can. Spring cleaning is a great time to actually clean and deoderize this container. Hint: the tub is a good place to do the cleaning, before you scrub the tub.

Spring Cleaning – The Kitchen

Walls and Appliances: When grease splatters or cake batter flies, you probably wipe it off in the moment, but you might not catch all of the grime that ends up covering your walls and appliances. Spring cleaning is the time to get rid of that caked-on dirt and grease. Spray all of your walls and appliances with an all-purpose cleaner and/or de-greaser and scrub them clean with a towel or sponge. Afterwards, rinse thoroughly to avoid leaving any sticky soap residue on the walls that could attract even more dirt and dust.

Kitchen Wall Hangings: This includes your kitchen clock and could extend to a hanging pot rack or even a spice rack or even a phone if you’ve got one mounted. Basically, anything that’s hanging on your walls or ceiling needs to come down for a thorough cleaning because nothing is safe from grease and dirt in the kitchen.

Oven: If you have a self-cleaning oven, run it now and wipe it down thoroughly when through (waiting several hours for the oven to cool down). One tip for self-cleaning ovens is to remove the temperature knobs because they tend to heat up and could melt. For regular ovens, follow your manufacturer’s instructions and/or the instructions on the oven cleaner you purchase. Always open any available windows and turn on vents when cleaning your oven to avoid fume contamination.

Refrigerator – Inside and Out: Throw out any expired food, empty jars, and other half-used products that are taking up space. Take out the refrigerator shelves and drawers. Wash them down, being careful with glass shelves. Wipe down the entire inside of the refrigerator and freezer before replacing shelves and food. Vacuum the coils of your unplugged refrigerator and wipe the outside completely, not forgetting the door handle (usually the filthiest part of the fridge!). If you can, ask someone to help you move the refrigerator to sweep and mop underneath it.

Stovetop:
Remove the knobs, burners, burner covers and spill catchers off the stovetop and either wash by hand or put into the dishwasher to clean and sanitize. Use a gentle abrasive and/or hot soapy water to thoroughly scrub the top of your stove. Use a crevice tool from your vacuum cleaner to remove crumbs or dirt from the cracks between your oven and the wall or counters.

Microwave: Wipe down and clean the microwave, washing the turntable by hand or putting it into the dishwasher. If the spills in the microwave are old or burnt in, boil a glass of water in the microwave. The steam should help loosen the crud. If the microwave smells, boil lemon juice to help freshen it up. Use glass cleaner on the outside surfaces and soapy water or all-purpose cleaner on the inside.

Kitchen Cabinets:Remove everything and wash the shelves, relining if necessary. Remove mismatched lids and bowls. Take out anything that isn’t being used on a regular basis. Reorganize and outsides of cabinets last.

Dishwasher:Try adding vinegar or baking soda to the empty dishwasher before running it. If your dishwasher has a food trap in the bottom, clean it out. Wash down the outside of the dishwasher.

Countertops: Don’t forget backsplashes.

Drawers: Remove everything and wipe the insides. This is a great time to tackle your “junk” drawer. If it’s really junk, throw it out. Remove utensils or cutlery that you don’t use and take the opportunity to re-organize and prioritize your kitchen items if you don’t feel they’re arranged in the most efficient manner possible.

Sink and Garbage Disposal: If you have a garbage disposal, now is the time to pour baking soda with warm water and/or a lemon peel down the disposal to freshen the drain. Put ice cubes through the disposal to sharpen the blades.