Crafty Egg Surprise CHEAP

eggSent to us from Cynthia and this originates from FaceBook profile: LittleBirdieInvitationsandDesigns. What a great cheap little egg gift that could be used to put in a basket, to decorate a table, little party gifts for adults, name tags with a tag tied on with a pretty ribbon. You can even used a multitude of different colored yarns that you have as leftovers. I am even thinking red, white and pink for Valentines Day, black and orange for Halloween. Birthdays could be colors to match your theme. Christmas red, green, white with something just very special inside. See where I am going? I even think you could get extra creative and glue or tie little embellishments onto these to make them extra special. You could even get the kids involved to make a bunch for a class party.

Table Kids Activity

 

Cake In A Jar

Ingredients

  • 1 (18.25 ounce) package yellow cake mix
  • 8 straight-sided wide-mouth pint canning jars with lids and rings
  • Icing

Directions

  1. Prepare the cake according to package instructions, or use any cake recipe.
  2. In pint size, straight-sided wide-mouth jars, put 1 cup of batter in each greased jar. Make sure to keep the rims of the jars clean. Put in preheated oven 350 degrees F (175 degrees C). Place jars on a cookie sheet to keep from tipping over while baking.
  3. Bake for 30 to 35 minutes, or until a toothpick inserted into cake comes out clean.
  4. While they are baking, have your jar lids boiling in a pan of water. When the cake is done, take one jar out at a time and add the hot lid and screw on your jar ring and let set and cool.
  5. It will seal as it cools. Place the jars on the counter and listen for them to ‘ping’ as they seal. If you miss the ‘ping’, wait until they are completely cool and press on the top of the lid. If it doesn’t move at all, it’s sealed.
  6. After it cools it will pull away from the jar and when you are ready to eat, open and pop out the cake and enjoy.
  7. Unsealed jars should be stored in the refrigerator and eaten within 2 weeks. Sealed jars may be stored in a freezer.

 

Icing: If sending this to a loved one include a small amount of icing in a can. If you give this to someone in person you can top the jar with icing right before you give it to them.

If mailing these wrap securely with bubble wrap!

When giving as a gift, top with a ten inch square fabric tied on with a ribbon and tag. You can also attach a little baggie with sprinkles, chocolate chips etc.

Kwanzaa Decoupaged Kinara

Materials
Pine (2″ x 1 5″ x 4″)
Decorative paper or fabric (1 5″ square)
Decoupage medium
Coordinating acrylic paint

General Supplies & Tools
Pencil
Scroll saw
Drill and W bit
Craft scissors
Paintbrushes
Brayer or large dowel
Craft knife

Instructions
1 . Enlarge Kinara pattern to desired size and copy onto pine. Using scroll saw, cut out wood. Center and drill seven W deep holes in top of holder.
2.  Cut paper or fabric slightly larger than side of candle holder. Brush liberal coat of decoupage medium onto one side of candle holder, then gently apply paper. Roll with large dowel to smooth and remove any air bubbles. Brush decoupage medium over top of paper and let dry. Using craft knife, trim excess paper from edges. Repeat process for other side, ends, and top of candle holder.
3.  Paint grooves and bottom of candle holder with coordinating acrylic paint.

Kwanzaa Noodle Necklace

Materials
Assorted uncooked noodles
Food coloring
Elastic thread

General Supplies & Tools
Newspaper
Plastic gloves
Plastic sandwich bags
Craft scissors
Yarn needle

Instructions
1 . Cover work area with newspaper, and wear plastic gloves when coloring noodles.
2.  Place one handful of noodles in bag, using one bag per color. Sprinkle a few drops of desired food color­ing in each bag, blow in some air, twist top closed, then gently shake until noodles are evenly coated. Add more color, if needed. Leave bags open to allow noodles to dry.
3.  Cut elastic thread slightly longer than desired length of necklace, then thread elastic onto yarn needle.
4. Tie one noodle to end of elastic thread, leaving a 2″ tail, and begin beading. Mix noodle shapes and colors as desired. Untie first noodle, then tie ends of elastic thread into knot. Slip loose ends back through center of noodles to conceal.

About Kwanzaa


The name Kwanzaa is derived from the phrase “matunda ya kwanza” which means “first fruits” in Swahili. Each family celebrates Kwanzaa in its own way, but celebrations often include songs and dances, African drums, storytelling, poetry reading, and a large traditional meal. On each of the seven nights, the family gathers and a child lights one of the candles on the Kinara (candleholder), then one of the seven principles is discussed. The principles, called the Nguzo Saba (seven principles in Swahili) are values of African culture which contribute to building and reinforcing community among African-Americans. Kwanzaa also has seven basic symbols which represent values and concepts reflective of African culture.  An African feast, called a Karamu, is held on December 31.

The candle-lighting ceremony each evening provides the opportunity to gather and discuss the meaning of Kwanzaa. The first night, the black candle in the center is lit (and the principle of umoja/unity is discussed). One candle is lit each evening and the appropriate principle is discussed.
Seven Principles

The seven principles, or Nguzo Saba are a set of ideals created by Dr. Maulana Karenga. Each day of Kwanzaa emphasizes a different principle.

Unity: Umoja (oo–MO–jah)
To strive for and maintain unity in the family, community, nation, and race.

Self-determination: Kujichagulia (koo–gee–cha–goo–LEE–yah)
To define ourselves, name ourselves, create for ourselves, and speak for ourselves.

Collective Work and Responsibility: Ujima (oo–GEE–mah)
To build and maintain our community together and make our brother’s and sister’s problems our problems and to solve them together.

Cooperative Economics: Ujamaa (oo–JAH–mah)
To build and maintain our own stores, shops, and other businesses and to profit from them together.

Purpose: Nia (nee–YAH)
To make our collective vocation the building and developing of our community in order to restore our people to their traditional greatness.

Creativity: Kuumba (koo–OOM–bah)
To do always as much as we can, in the way we can, in order to leave our community more beautiful and beneficial than we inherited it.

Faith: Imani (ee–MAH–nee)
To believe with all our heart in our people, our parents, our teachers, our leaders, and the righteousness and victory of our struggle.

Personalized Punch Cups – Party Idea

Look-alike plastic cups have a way of losing themselves in a crowd. To save guests the bother of cup hunting (and avoid waste in the bargain), add large starburst stickers to each cup, along with smaller stars or other stickers for decoration. Next to an assortment of markers, set up a placard directing guests to sign and retain the cup of their choice.