Unmatched & Mismatched Socks Stuffed Snake

44310_794621863897624_1887458781_n

Cut the foot part of socks off and overlap them one onto another until you get desired length. You can sew or use glue to attach to each other. The sock you use to make the head you leave the foot on. Stuff with poly fiber. Add buttons for eyes and a felt tongue. Use this same design and stuff with dried beans to put an end to a cold draft under a door or in a window sill.

Halloween Floral Bouquet

1150293_10151838607720266_20330505_nWhat a simple idea for a quick floral arrangement idea. Fill the bottom of large pitcher or bowl with jelley beans, Place smaller vase inside and sill gap with marshmallow characters, candy corn and black jelly beans. Arrange floral bouquet in the inside vase.

Kitchen Drawar Organization By Guest Writer Cindy Davis

Kitchen organizing is something we all do whenever we have to prepare a meal. Whether done consciously or without giving it too much thought it is something simply ingrained in our minds. If we want to keep our kitchen in a condition that helps instead of hindering our cooking efforts we need to have quite a few things done. Kitchen drawers are pretty much the most commonly-used area where we store the majority of what we need to do our job. Here are some tips on what you can do to keep things in order, adding functionality to your work space:Kitchen Drawer Organization

  • Prepare a junk drawer

Making sure you have one drawer for all those little bits around your kitchen you’re not certain about will ensure you can deal with the clutter. These can be mostly things you haven’t used in over a year or the odd piece of clothing that must be turned into a cleaning rag.

  • The spice drawer

Spices are essential to our cooking and that is why they deserve the preferential treatment. Having their own drawer will not only make it easier for you to find them, but it will also allow you to keep them out of sight. You can organize them by using special compartments for the spices with their own lids, where you can take as much as you need with a spoon or your fingertips. Alternately you can organize them with their bottles or spice jars if the depth of the drawer allows it.Kitchen Drawer Organization2

  • Utensil drawer

Utensils are something else we can’t do without and unless they are properly organized we will have to endure rifling through the contents of a single drawer, trying to dig out what we need. Luckily, there are plenty of organizers on the market that fit within most drawers in our kitchen furniture. Another alternative to that can be drawer dividers which allow us to compartmentalize the contents of our drawers according to our needs. They come in varying sizes that are affordable and easy to install.

  • Pot and lid drawer

Depending on your furniture you might be blessed with deep, comfortable drawers. If you have these, then you can make use of that space in the best way possible. Stacking pots inside one another or side by side is not difficult, however the lids can become a problem if the space doesn’t allow them to stay without banging around. There are lid organizers on the market, which look pretty much the same way as a plate organizer. Make use of these when you are preparing  for cleaning and organizing your N11 drawers.

  • Kitchen Drawer Organization3Canned food drawer

Depending on the size of your drawer and the amount of canned sauces, food and other canned goodies you’re using you might be able to organize them very well. You can lay them down in separate lanes using dividers to keep several cans of a tomato sauce for example. If you feel creative you can emulate the can dispensers in stores and you can have a carpenter construct one of these for  you. The use gravity to dispense individual cans, stopping them before they fall out with a little hooked end. These are sold as wire-rack varieties for cabinet or kitchen top use.

  • Grains and beans drawer

You can make use of plastic containers to keep your rice, beans, lentils or any other types of grains or beans you’re cooking with often. This will allow you quick access as well as perfect organization through proper labeling. You can also put your salt, sugar, flour and other vital ingredients here or in a similar drawer.

Bio: Cindy Davis is dedicated writer with great flair for home improvement and home remodeling projects. She is currently focused mainly on the household cleaning and organizing field and therefore her present article treats exactly this theme.

Magic Jelly Beans

555114_478480305534822_1906957858_nAs the weather gets nicer outside I am dieing to get out and garden. I found this great little planting treat on Face Book on $5-10 Dollar Meals- Cheap Eats. Grab a handful of Jelly Beans and plant them in the garden with your children. Have them water them thoroughly and talk to them about planting and how something that starts from seeds can grow and provide us with food to eat. Do tell them though that these Jelly Beans are a fun magical experiment and that if they plant them and nourish them carefully something might grow that they will love. In a couple of days after you see them watering and caring for their magical beans – when they are not looking – take the beans out and “plant” a huge lollipop. They learn something about the process of gardening, doing a little work pays off and may want to help more in the garden.

\

The Three Sisters – Corn, Beans and Squash

Editor’s Note: Copied from: http://www.threes.com/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=2335:three-sisters-corn-beans-squash&catid=79:food-nutrition&Itemid=57 – Please check out this great website for more great information like is found in this article. I read this and thought about how great a story this is and wanted to share with my readers. Hope you enjoy and please check The Book Of Three’s.

_____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

Three SistersThe ancient Native American technique of growing Corn, Beans, and Squash together in an arrangement called the Three Sisters is the ultimate in companion planting and helps increase harvests, naturally!

Corn acts as a support for climbing bean vines, the beans fix nitrogen in the soil for the high feeding requirements of corn and squash, and the squash provides mulch and root protection for the corn and beans! After cooperating beautifully in the garden, corn and beans form a complete protein when eaten together! How’s that for a mutually beneficial relationship?

The Three Sisters are all easy to direct sow in the garden and are a great project for children, teaching them about the beauty of natural harmony while providing a fast-growing reward for their efforts.

Make the best possible use of your garden space this season, and try growing the Three Sisters! Just follow the easy steps listed below, fertilize well, plant other companions like herbs to assist with pest control, and you’ll be harvesting your best crop in no time!

The Iroquois believe corn, beans and squash are precious gifts from the Great Spirit, each watched over by one of three sisters spirits, called the De-o-ha-ko, or “Our Sustainers”. The planting season is marked by ceremonies to honor them, and a festival commemorates the first harvest of “green” corn on the cob. By retelling the stories and performing annual rituals, Native Americans passed down the knowledge of growing, using and preserving the Three Sisters through generations.

Planting instructions

In May or June when soil has warmed:

Shape a flat-topped circular mound of soil about a foot high and 2 feet across at the top, sloping outward toward the base. Plant a circle of Corn seeds on top, about 5 or 6, and water them in well, tamping down your soil mound firmly so it doesn’t wash away in the first rain. Space the mounds 3 or 4 feet apart in the garden.

Since all corn grows on sturdy, dependable stalks, the variety you choose depends on the flavor, disease resistance, and holding ability you want. Sugar Buns is a Sugar Enhanced (SE) yellow hybrid with absolutely scrumptious golden kernels and is positively scrumptious. For SE whites, you can’t beat Silver Princess, with extra-long ears bursting with flavor. And for the sweetest ears yet, you absolutely must try new Corn Mirai™, available in Yellow, White, Bicolor, and even a Mini!

About two weeks later:

When your corn reaches about 5 or 6 inches high, plant Bean seeds (6 to 8 of them) around the edges of the flat top or about halfway down the sloping sides of the circular mound. Push the seeds down deep into the soil and, if you’re planting on the slope, make sure the soil is nice and firm. Add a bit of Nature’s Aid at planting time to help the Beans fix nitrogen.

To get your Beans to climb up the cornstalks, choose Pole rather than Bush varieties. Smeraldo is far and away the best-tasting Pole Bean, with flat pods up to 10 inches long on vigorous 4- to 6-foot vines. Park gardeners rave about Kwintus, a super-early performer with succulent pods on stringless 8- to 10-inch pods. And Blue Lake is the classic name in Beans, with top-quality dark green pods that are both stringless and fiberless, even if you pick them a bit late. We even have Blue Lake available in organic seed!

One week or so after that:

Plant Squash seeds around the base of the mound, on flat ground. You can make them radiate around the mound, or just go in the direction you have available space! 6 to 8 seeds in a ring around the base of the mound is usually plenty.

The traditional Squash family member for this Sister is Pumpkin, with its all-American flavor and long growing season. Rumbo is a unique Korean variety that looks like an heirloom Pumpkin but tastes sweeter and more succulent than a Butternut Squash! For a quicker harvest, grow Summer Squash varieties such as organic Park’s Early Summer Crookneck or Zucchini such as space-saving One Ball Hybrid.

When everything begins growing . . .

Thin the plantings to 2 or 3 Corn stalks, each with no more than 2 Bean plants winding around it. (You’ll need to help the Beans get started growing up the stalks). The Squash is going to vine along the ground, so the number of plants you need depends on how far apart your mounds of corn and beans are, how long the vines get, and how much walking space you need in the garden.