The Tooth Fairy Blackboard Picture Setting

edit-19908-1453418853-4Make a blackboard up that you can take a picture of with your child for each and every new tooth they loose. Include which tooth number the child just lost, date and age. This makes a perfect little keepsake to place in their scrapbook that tells a little story all on its own.

2015 My Year In Review – Scrapbook Page

10401121_10153830784443234_4232602382491130498_nOriginal credit goes to http://www.skiptomylou.org.

Use this as a templet to create a year in review for your child’s scrapbook.  Help your child fill the form in and allow them to color the design in at the same time. This page in a scrapbook will also introduce another new year.

Easter Bunny Cutout / Outline

10801707_10153029929365630_3993775323648273587_nUse this graphic to:

~Have a coloring contest with the kids – print as a 8″ x10″

~Print four per page and use different colored pastel papers and then attach side by side for garland going across

~Print four per page and use different colored pastel papers and then attach top to bottom for garland going up and down

~Print twelve per page and use as scrapbook garnishment

~Print twelve per page and use as pin on name cards

~Print twelve per page and use as table name cards

Anything else anyone can think of post in comments….. I am sure the creative people can come up with lots of ideas!

Creating Memories During The Holiday Season

295757_366398673449765_1321707704_nFor as long as I can remember my home as always been decorated from top to bottom with every nook and corner having just the right decoration from when I was young to now. I remember my Mom always making our Christmas special in every way that she could from baked goods to a tree that often had more than one ornament per branch. Garlands and lights were strung inside and out and walls and doors were always marked with something festive to help celebrate. Yes, my family has been told more than once that it looks like Christmas threw up in our home but we don’t care.

Special times and celebrations have always been important during this time of year and making keepsakes is always important. The picture above shows the cut off end of a Christmas tree made into an ornament which makes for a cherished keepsake. Just use a cut disk from the bottom trunk and write a message with a sharpie. Drill a hole and use wire or ribbon to make a loop and bow to hang.

I often will keep little pieces of wrapping papers and tags from presents. I trim them nicely into squares and bundle them together often with just a staple. I have had meaning to place them in scrapbooks but our family has kept photos more digitally then printing them out these past few years. I have also thought about Modge-Podging them to pre-cut forms that would make nice keepsake ornaments. They go into our memory boxes that each person in the family has and I hope the kids enjoy these memory reminders when they are older..

Ornaments seem to always be in abundance in my home as each year each family member gets one that represents something significant that occurred that year. I am always finding ornaments in repair and take the time to do just that even though we can never use them all. I have marked years and names on them and I suppose in the years after I am no longer here that they will find their way to who they belong. Until then these will remain with me as special little memory reminders.

Special dinners and present giving is always important to me as well. I find finding that special present and even the perfect wrapping paper for my loved ones fun to do. I know I hear a lot that many consider it a chore – and I always reply if it is such a burden don’t do it. I do not personally care if I receive anything or not in return but always find special and thoughtful gifts mean more than expensive costly presents.

I am also one of those obnoxious people who send out a family newsletter – and some may think it is obnoxious but others start asking when they will get it if it is taking a little longer than usual to get it. I do try to keep it short and concise but always bear in mind that some of the information may be of no interest to you but someone else may want o hear about it. I also send several pictures out so people can see some of our years events. I have cut my list of those who I send to down as the years go on – those who send nothing or barely take the time to even sign a card I feel would prefer to cease communication and I have started to oblige.

The packing up of all of the decorations and keepsakes always takes a few days in my home but I enjoy taking the time to put them all away because the more time that is devoted to putting them away the easier it is to unpack – and enjoy reliving the memories the following year.

What special things do you do for the holidays to help create memories? How to you create little keepsakes other than pictures? What special events does your family partake in this time of year?

Scrapbook Flower From Cupcake Liner

Scrap Booking Using Kitchen Supplies

Simple techniques can add serious “wow” to your scrapbook layouts when you use unusual supplies to create page accents. And cupcake liners, a kitchen staple, are a perfect substitute for patterned paper when you create flowers. The lightweight texture adds an element of surprise to your creation.

Here, we’ll show you two “can’t miss” flower ideas for your cupcake liners: fringed flowers and box flowers.

1. Fold cupcake liner in half. Cut fringe along crimped edge of liner. Unfold.

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2. Cut another liner in spiral direction, leaving nickel-sized circle as the base.

 

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3. Adhere spiral to circle base in circular fashion. Top with button or brad.

How to Create a Cupcake Liner Box Flower

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1. Fold four cupcake liners in half.

 

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2. Layer folded liners over one another and secure together with adhesive.

 

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3. Fold back each cupcake liner edge to add dimension.

(Originally posted at: http://www.creatingkeepsakes.com/articles/Box_Flower_and_Fringe_Flower_Techniques?bc=c ! Scrap Booking Technique: Using Cupcake Liners to Create Flower Accents by Joannie McBride)

Keeping Kids Busy

143 Things for Your Kids To Keep Busy With:

  • make paper snowflakes
  • clean out the toy box
  • send virtual greeting cards
  • choose photos for a family calendar
  • have an indoor picnic
  • bake and decorate cut-out cookies
  • go camping in the livingroom
  • clear out your email inbox
  • make a mobile out of found objects (acorns, rocks, branches)
  • write up some New Year’s Resolutions
  • create a simple Family Tree
  • make sandwiches and cut them out with large cookie cutters
  • play basketball with a wadded up piece of paper and a wastebasket
  • play board games
  • make a tent out of blankets
  • read books
  • make homemade play dough
  • play with play dough
  • write a letter to a relative, friend or pen pal
  • clean bedroom
  • vacuum living room
  • clean bathroom
  • make a craft
  • draw
  • color
  • paint
  • watch a movie
  • write stories
  • use magnifying glass
  • write a play
  • act out a play
  • invent indoor circus acts
  • perform an indoor circus
  • play card games
  • dust the house
  • brush the pet
  • write letters
  • read a magazine
  • play dress-up
  • play Cowboys
  • build a fort in your rooms
  • do a jigsaw puzzle
  • play on the Geosafari
  • play on the computer
  • listen to a story or book on tape
  • do extra schoolwork to get ahead
  • do brain teasers (ie: crosswords, word searches, hidden pictures, mazes, etc.)
  • cook
  • prepare lunch
  • surprise a neighbor with a good deed
  • play store
  • prepare a “restaurant” lunch with menus
  • hold a tea party
  • have a Teddy bear picnic on the floor in the livingroom
  • play with toy cars
  • play dolls
  • play house
  • learn magic tricks
  • put on a magic show
  • make sock puppets
  • put on a puppet show
  • crochet or knit
  • make doll clothes
  • sew buttons in designs on old shirts
  • make bookmarks
  • take a quiet rest time
  • take a shower or bath
  • organize a dresser drawer
  • clean under the bed
  • empty dishwasher
  • vacuum under the couch cushions and keep any change found
  • write these ideas on pieces of paper and pick out one or two to do
  • practice musical instruments
  • perform a family concert
  • teach yourself to play musical instrument (recorder, harmonica, guitar)
  • fold laundry
  • sweep kitchen or bathroom floors
  • vacuum or dust window blinds
  • clean bathroom mirrors
  • clean sliding glass doors
  • copy your favorite book illustration
  • design your own game
  • build with blocks or Legos
  • create a design box (copper wire, string, odds-and-ends of things destined for the
  • garbage, pom-poms, thread, yarn, etc.)
  • have a marble tournament on the livingroom carpet
  • make dessert
  • make dinner
  • give your pet a party
  • have a read-a-thon with a friend or sibling
  • check out a science book and try some experiments
  • make up a story
  • arrange photo albums
  • play hide-and-seek
  • create a symphony with bottles and pans and rubber bands
  • read a story to a younger child
  • string dry noodles or O-shaped cereals into a necklace
  • glue noodles into a design on paper
  • play jacks
  • make up a song
  • make an indoor teepee out of blankets
  • write in your journal
  • play charades
  • make up a story by drawing pictures
  • draw a cartoon strip
  • make a map of your bedroom, house or neighborhood
  • call a friend
  • cut pictures from old magazines and write a story
  • make a collage using pictures cut from old magazines
  • do a secret service for a neighbor
  • plan a treasure hunt
  • make a treasure map
  • make up a “Bored List” of things to do
  • plan a special activity for your family
  • search your house for items made in other countries and then learn about those
  • countries from the encyclopedia or online
  • plan an imaginary trip to the moon
  • plan an imaginary trip around the world, where would you want to go
  • write a science-fiction story
  • find a new pen pal
  • make up a play using old clothes as costumes
  • make up a game for practicing math facts
  • have a Spelling Bee
  • make up a game for practicing spelling
  • write newspaper articles for a pretend newspaper
  • put together a family newsletter
  • write reviews of movies or plays or TV shows or concerts you see during the break from school
  • bake a cake
  • bake a batch of cookies
  • decorate a shoe box
  • make a hideout or clubhouse
  • make paper airplanes
  • have paper airplane races
  • learn origami
  • make friendship bracelets for your friends
  • make a wind chime out of things headed for the garbage
  • paint your face
  • braid hair
  • play tag
  • make food sculptures (from pretzels, gumdrops, string licorice, raisins, cream cheese, peanuts, peanut butter, etc.) and then eat it
  • produce a talent show
  • memorize a poem
  • recite a memorized poem for your family

Distressing Techniques

Distress Inks have been specially formulated to produce an aged look on papers, photos, fibers and more. These inks are not “better” than other inks; they just work completely “different” for the purpose of creating an aged look.

Here are some key points that make Distress Inks different:

STAYS WET LONGER ; the Distress Ink formulation allows blending and shading on photos and paper, as well as embossing! Other dye inks dry too fast, especially on photos which would result in lines and marks for direct to paper techniques.  Not with Distress Inks!

COLOR WICKS OR SPREADS OUT – these inks will travel across the surface of your paper when spritzed with water; other dyes do not travel as much although they might bleed a little when wet, the Distress Inks actually “wick” or spread out much further creating several tone on tones.

COLOR STABILITY – the colors of the Distress Inks will not break down when wet or heated allowing you to have more color control for the finished look;  other “brown colored” dyes will break down when water is added leaving a pink & green hue.

COLOR PALETTE – Well these are unlike ANY other colors of inks you’ve seen!

*Antique Linen: the color of aged lace or linens found in the cherished heirlooms of grandmother’s trunk.

*Tea Dye: the orange hue of saturated tea bags with the results of dying in a tea bath for days.

*Vintage Photo: this color is captured right out of the photographs from times gone by.

*Walnut Stain: a rich, dark stain of an old walnut tree perfect to create a dark wash of color

* Fired Brick: the look of charred cinders from an old camp fire

* Weathered Wood: the patina on a dairy barn’s window frame

TO DISTRESS: I like to use water when I am distressing.  I think it gives the papers more of a weathered texture, so here’s how I start.

Working on any type of paper (manila, card stock, or text weight), crumple the paper up – always press in the center of any heavyweight card stock or manila stock – this will break the surface tension of the paper and allow you to crumple up the paper easier without tearing it.

Next rub the Distress pads over the surface – you can work with several different colors or just one – WALNUT STAIN IS IDEAL FOR THIS.

Then spray the inked surface with water (you will immediately notice the ink “travels” outward when water is applied as these inks are designed to react with water).

Heat the surface to dry – and here’s why…  Although you don’t have to Heat Set these inks for any reason, I like to dry the water using either my Heat Tool or a craft iron.  This will allow for more tone control and keep areas dark and others light.  Ironing the paper will also give you a much smoother surface to stamp on without compromising the aged finish.

Note: If you allow the surface to air-dry most of your color will end up on the edges only because the paper will bend and buckle when wet, forcing the ink and water to the edges.  Notice that these Distress Inks retain their color value even when wet and dried.  Other brown dyes will break down in color (sometimes leaving a pink and green hue).

FOR STAMPING:  What can I say about the many stamping applications these inks can achieve.  Once again the special formulation on these Distress Inks provides a versatile finish on papers yet still allow for “normal” stamping applications.  I like to stamp on uncoated (matte) papers and immediately rub the image with a cloth – this will soften or shadow your image WITHOUT smudging any detail, VINTAGE PHOTO, WALNUT STAIN and TEA DYE are wonderful for this one!  Another surface is glossy card stock – keep in mind this is a different type of dye ink so when you stamp on glossy, certain areas of your image will “bead” up, once again providing a Distressed look without you doing a thing (this is probably one of my most favorite looks) – some areas of the image appear “pitted”.  Brayering on glossy cardstock is also wonderful because you can still manipulate the inks with different tools, brushes, fingers, whatever.  Even after the ink is applied you can achieve amazing texture and color shading.

ON PHOTOS:  Finally an ink formulated for photos!  Whether you’re a scrapbooker or not you can use all types of photos (vintage or new ones) on your cards and pages.  Distress Inks work on MOST types of black and white photos – inkjet, laser, toner copies, and regular photos. Always test the type of photo paper and printer first!!!

Tinting Photos:

*Tint your photos using your choice of Distress Ink colors and the Cut n’ Dry Nibs.

* Drag the nib across the Distress pad to pick up ink and color directly on to your photo using the nib ; the inks blend without leaving any lines.

* For larger background areas, tint the photo using a cosmetic make up sponge or craft sponge.

* Tap the foam on to the Distress pad and wipe inks on to your photo.  Repeat for desired look.

Distressing Photos:

* To Distress, begin with the lightest colors ANTIQUE LINEN only (direct to photo).  Cover the photo in the lighter color. ; THIS WILL NOT SMEAR ANY OF THE DISTRESS INKS COLORS YOU TINTED WITH!

*Blend the photo with a clean piece of foam or cosmetic make up sponge immediately after applying ink.

*Next, age the edges with VINTAGE PHOTO or WALNUT STAIN by applying the ink with foam or cosmetic make up sponge.