Open-Faced Breakfast Sandwich

201: cut square from piece of bread and place in buttery pan

2:drop en egg from eggshell into whole

3:move egg around until egg fills square

4:add ham

5:add cheese

6:add square that you cut from bread in number one

7:pat down bread square onto melted cheese

8: enjoy your open faced breakfast sandwich

I have done this on more than one occasion – you can substitute bacon or sausage for the meat and the egg could be scrambled before placing in pan.

Onion Ring Egg Fry

egg fry frying onion ring eggs try new way methodThis works really well -Slice a large onion in 1/2 inch wedges. Pick the largest outer rings of the onion and set aside the rest of the onion in a zip-lock bag to use for a later time. Put spray/oil/butter in pan and melt. Place the onion ring down in pan so that the widest part is facing up. Crack and drop egg into ring. Let cook until ready to flip (if that is your desired way to have your egg and then flip. If you want no runny egg once flipped poke the egg yolk and let cook and then flip again and cook to get desired egg type. You can also oil a baking pan –  place onion slices down into pan and crack open eggs and place withing onion edges. Bake 350 for five to 8 minutes until desired egg type is achieved.

Successful Frying

•The secret is using the right oil. Smoke point is the temperature at which fats and oils begin to smoke, indicating they’ve begun to break down. The higher the smoke point, the better it is for frying. Lard and some vegetable oils such as corn, canola, safflower, and peanut are good choices. Shortening is not suitable for high-temperature frying.
• Moisture and food particles break down oil, so don’t reuse it more than twice. If you see smoke, discard the oil, and start over.
• Achieving and maintaining proper oil temperature is a must. If it’s not hot enough (often caused by overcrowding), the food soaks up oil, leaving it greasy. Too hot, and the outside burns before the inside cooks, creating food that’s soggy.
• Use heavy-duty aluminum, stainless steel, or cast-iron cookware for even heat distribution and the retention of high temperatures. Iron speeds up the breakdown of oil, so when using cast-iron cookware, it’s best to use the oil only once.
• Choose cookware that’s large enough to leave at least 3 inches between the surface of the oil and the top of the skillet or Dutch oven.
• Always allow the oil to return to its proper temperature between batches. We like to use a candy thermometer, which can handle high temperatures and be attached to the side of a large skillet or Dutch oven for instant readings.
• Make sure food is dry. Adding moist food to hot oil will cause spattering and popping.

Perfect French Fries – EVERYTIME

Choose low-moisture, high-starch potatoes such as russet or Idaho. For crisp fries, wash the cut, uncooked strips in several batches of cold water until the water is clear. However, for the crispiest fries, we found the double-fry method hard to beat. Frying strips twice in the same oil at different temperatures gives you fries like no others. This recipe, using the double-fry method, received our highest rating.

FRENCH FRIES
MAKES 4 TO 6 SERVINGS
PREP: 30 MIN., FRY: 7 MIN. PER BATCH

Potatoes cut into strips are the crispiest of the potato shapes.

4 pounds russet or Idaho potatoes, peeled

Vegetable oil Salt to taste

CUT potatoes into 1/2-inch-wide strips.

POUR vegetable oil to a depth of 4 inches in a Dutch oven, and heat to 325°. Fry potato strips, in batches, until lightly golden, but not brown, 4 to 5 minutes per batch. Drain strips on paper towels. HEAT oil to 375°. Fry strips, in small batches, until golden brown and crisp, 1 to 2 minutes per batch. Drain on clean paper towels. Sprinkle with salt, and serve immediately.

CRINKLE-CUT FRIES: Cut potatoes into 1/2-inch-wide strips with a waffle cutter. Fry as directed.

WAFFLE CHIPS: Cut potatoes into 1/2-inch-thick slices with a waffle cutter. Fry as directed.