Ways to Prevent Dry Rot in Homes

In most cases people fail to understand that dry rot may not always be as easy to remove as it looks at first sight. Dry rot is a lot tougher, as it requires minuscule amounts of water to begin. This is a very important reason why you should always keep your eyes open. One of the main reasons why dry rot occurs is because of high humidity in the area or even inside the home itself. Thankfully, there are quite a few methods to get things done as we will point out here:

Checking the ventilation should be the first step toward making things happen. One of the chief reasons for dry rot is the poor ventilation of indoor surfaces, thus making it possible. You may need to address flaws in the ventilation system as well as any damage that may be causing the increased humidity.
Ways to Prevent Dry Rot in Homes
Insulation also plays a key part in keeping things balanced, since your home needs it to avoid humidity issues and to keep a constant and steady temperature level. You have to ensure the insulation works and that its not damaged in any way. One of the most common mistakes people make is to insulate their roofs only, completely missing the point of insulating the floor of their attic as well as the basement.

You should check out the crawl spaces of your home. If you happen to have any such spaces, you should make sure you see whether there are any signs of moisture or rot at all at least once or twice every year. One of the simplest ways of covering a floor so you can block moisture coming from the ground is to put up plastic sheets, though that also calls for better solutions in the long run.
Ways to Prevent Dry Rot in Homes2
You should also do your best to find and repair any possible leaks that may have occurred. This has to be done as soon as possible when you find them. Not addressing the issue as soon as you can will end up bringing more moisture in the area, thus leading to a number of underlying problems such as increased risk of dry rot in the future.

You can also apply good amounts of fungicide to stop dry rot dead in its tracks. Since its caused by a type of fungus which eats the wood, fungicide can be an excellent solution to the problem that acts quickly and efficiently.

You must replace what you can if its necessary. In case you find that the rot has advanced too much, you will need to make sure you remove the infected areas completely, as it may spread to the rest of the nearby surfaces.

Read more tips here: http://www.removalservicesmovers.co.uk/N1-house-removals-islington/house-move-N1.html

Blueberry Tid-Bits

Here are a few nuggets of information to help you make the most of this glorious fruit.
• Blueberries belong to the same family as the wild huckleberry or azalea.
• The powdery gray-blue bloom on the sur­face of the skin helps the small berry retain its moisture after harvest.
• Blueberries do not ripen further after they’re picked.
•Blueberries aren’t as perishable as other berries and will keep about a week if handled properly. Place them in a plastic container and refrigerate as soon as possi­ble. Don’t wash berries until you’re ready to use them. (Added moisture will hasten growth of mold.)
•Washing blueberries before freezing results in toughening of their skin.
• A pint of blueberries serves four people generously.

Successful Frying

•The secret is using the right oil. Smoke point is the temperature at which fats and oils begin to smoke, indicating they’ve begun to break down. The higher the smoke point, the better it is for frying. Lard and some vegetable oils such as corn, canola, safflower, and peanut are good choices. Shortening is not suitable for high-temperature frying.
• Moisture and food particles break down oil, so don’t reuse it more than twice. If you see smoke, discard the oil, and start over.
• Achieving and maintaining proper oil temperature is a must. If it’s not hot enough (often caused by overcrowding), the food soaks up oil, leaving it greasy. Too hot, and the outside burns before the inside cooks, creating food that’s soggy.
• Use heavy-duty aluminum, stainless steel, or cast-iron cookware for even heat distribution and the retention of high temperatures. Iron speeds up the breakdown of oil, so when using cast-iron cookware, it’s best to use the oil only once.
• Choose cookware that’s large enough to leave at least 3 inches between the surface of the oil and the top of the skillet or Dutch oven.
• Always allow the oil to return to its proper temperature between batches. We like to use a candy thermometer, which can handle high temperatures and be attached to the side of a large skillet or Dutch oven for instant readings.
• Make sure food is dry. Adding moist food to hot oil will cause spattering and popping.