Christmas Tree Ornament Handprint Keepsake

10565004_855078867867552_1274285936734237366_nUse favorite colored ornaments either made from plastic or glass (caution should be taken when working with children and glass ornaments). ‘Paint’ child’s hand using white (or choose a color and be bold) finger paint. Have them grab a hold of the bottom of the bulb making sure not to squeeze bulb or to move once hand has made contact with the bulb. Have the child gently remove their fingers first by pulling straight off. Then remove palm. Decorate the ‘snowmen’. You might want to spray a protective coating of polyurethane to keep the paint from peeling. You could also use glue instead of paint and just glitter the whole hand. Great keepsake and would be a perfect gift for grandparents, uncles and aunts.

Paint Glass Different Colors

420610_625983630765062_442155601_nMix a clear white paint with fabric dye/food coloring until you get desired color. Paint the outside of the glass and let dry. You should have a nice color and you can seal that with varnish or polyurethane to prevent it from peeling. Use to store food products (stored in zip lock bags) in the kitchen, craft items, office supplies in the office, seeds for your garden etc. Do not use these by directly putting food inside of them for your protection. You could paint the bottoms one color and when dry paint the tops another color letting them drip down. I think this being done to a larger size container could be used as a centerpiece for a wedding since you could color co-ordinate them with different color schemes. You can do this with recycled items or it would really bring a dollar store vase up a notch… and don’t stop at glass – you can do this same process with plastic.

Use For Old Buttons

What a great idea for all of your old loose buttons just sitting around waiting to find a good home. Can be done on an old lampshade that can be painted or on a new white one like seen here to provide a glow to the buttons. Would make a great shade for a child’s room or your craft room. Where might you use this idea? Do you have enough buttons for a project like this?

Tomato Sewing Pincushions

1. Cut a rectangle of fabric on the bias that’s twice as long as it is wide (the largest we made was 3 1/4 inches in diameter and required a 10-by-5-inch piece).With fabric facing right side up, fold in half as shown, and join ends with a 1/4-inch seam. Sew a running stitch around the top edge; tightly pull thread to cinch fabric, and secure with stitches.

2. Turn pouch right side out. Stuff with batting (cotton batting is firmer than polyester). Sew a running stitch around the open end; pull thread to cinch fabric. Tack shut with a few stitches and knot. To flatten, double-thread a cording needle with crochet thread and pull it through the “core” a few times. Mimic a tomato’s fluted details by wrapping the thread around the cushion and back through the core several times. Knot thread at top to finish.

3. For heirloom tomatoes, cut a circle of fabric (the largest we made was 3 1/2 inches in diameter and required a 10-inch-diameter circle). With fabric wrong side up, sew a running stitch around perimeter. Place batting in center of fabric, and gather into a pouch. Stuff with more batting, pull thread to cinch, and tack with stitches. Flatten cushion and apply details as in step 2.

4. For tops, photocopy template, enlarging or reducing as desired; cut out. Trace template onto green felt with a disappearing-ink pen; cut out. Using a single-threaded needle, sew a loop onto top. Glue top to tomato.

Note: To sew cherry-tomato pincushions, start with swatches of fabric that are 2 3/4 by 4 3/4 inches. Follow steps 1 and 2 below, but don’t flatten cushion or add fluted details. For tops, cut symmetrical, six-pointed stars from green felt. Add loops, and attach them as in step 4.