Outside Creative Lighting Solution

You will need some chunks of logs that are wide enough and cut straight enough to stand on their own. On one side use an auger to drill a hole wide enough so that the base of a solar light can fit into it. Use e6000 and glue the base of the solar light into the hole. Now stand the log in your garden or on your deck. So much better looking then just pushing these guys into the ground plus you get light up a bit higher which will be more useful.

Thanksgiving Day Pumpkin Lights

Who said pumpkins can only be used for Thanksgiving? I founds these and thought how great it would be to have several lining a pathway to your home, have one or two snuggled into a garden or to have one or two in your home. Remember, you don’t have to use candles – there are many battery operated options to use now. You prepare the pumpkin the same way you do for a pumpkin you are going to carve. Use various drill bits to crate patterns like seen above or use a sharpie marker to draw your own. Two tips I will give: 1:take a large cup and turn it so the drill bit goes through it and covers a portion of your drill and 2: use the lowest speed on your drill. Best to use an old drill for this and use lots of caution. They are really cute and unexpected and guests will love them.

Fondant Strawberry Candy House

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Even though this is a cake with fondant I thought it was something I had to share. Use for inspiration do create a gingerbread house.

Artist: Pink Cake Box

Child Safety On The Way To School

On any given day students board school buses to travel to schools. Statistically, school buses are the safest way for students to travel to school — even safer than riding in the family car.
Many students walk to school or to bus stops.
In either case, parents can help to make the trip to school as safe and easy as possible for their children just by discussing a few basic rules:

Walking or riding a bike to school or to a school bus stop:

– Parents should show their children the safe walk path to use and encourage them to fol
low that path.
– Obey all traffic signals, signs, and/or crossing guards. Use crosswalks where available. H Walk bikes through intersec­tions
ffl Walk with a buddy, if pos­sible, and be aware of the sur­roundings.
– Never talk to or respond to strangers. If a stranger ap­proaches or tries to get a child to come to him/her, the child should run home, to a neigh­bor’s house, or another safe place such as a business, and ask an adult for help.
–  Reflective material makes walkers and bicyclists more vis­ible to street traffic. B Always wear a helmet when riding a bike (grownups too).

At the bus stop:

– Know your school bus number.
– Get to the bus stop at least five minutes before the bus is scheduled to arrive. Running to catch the bus is dangerous and can lead to injuries.
– While waiting for the bus, stand at least five giant steps (10 feet) away from the curb and line up away from the street.
– Wait until the bus stops, the door opens, and the driver says it is OK to board before getting onto the bus.
– Students crossing the street in front of the bus should walk on the sidewalk or along the road to a point at least 10 giant steps ahead of the bus before crossing. (Better yet, cross at an intersection and use the cross­walk if one is available.) Be sure that the bus driver can see you and that you can see the driver when crossing the street, and watch for traffic com­ing both ways.
– When you are dropped off at school or at the bus stop, walk 10 giant steps away from the bus. If you need to cross the street, wait until the driver tells you its okay and cross in front of the bus. NEVER walk behind a bus.
– Use the handrail to enter and exit the bus.
– If you drop something near or under the bus, tell the bus driver. DO NOT ATTEMPT TO PICK IT UP because the driver may not be able to see you.
– School buses are loaded or unloaded at established school bus stops only, unless an emergency dictates otherwise.