A Guide To Buying The Perfect Bike Rack For Your Vehicle

guide-to-buying-the-perfect-bike-rack ~ Submitted by Mike Thomas 7/2/2013 ~

Recycled Bike Rim Pot Hanger

What a great way to recycle an old bike tire. Holes are already along the sides to insert hooks into or over that can be purchased at any hardware store along with simple chains to hang. Pictured it is hung by a rod and hook system but chains are easier to attach. Make sure the hook that this is all attached to is deeply embedded into a rafter to avoid a terrible accident. Use this for lighter weight pans or use as a utensil hanger. If you want to use this for heavier pots and pans remove spokes and cut a 1″ thick piece of wood the diameter of the rim (use the rim as a template) stain or paint then polyurethane and attach to rim. This will give a much stronger rack that you can hang heavier items on. I think this look great…. can anyone else come up with another usage for an old bike rim? If you can share in the comments:

Bike Box… Mailbox?

This mailbox turned bike basket is so charming, it practically deserves its own address. A standard aluminum letter box is lightweight, fits gracefully over the rear tire, and provides a generous amount of storage for the goods you pick up on spins around town. The door’s latch keeps it securely closed so your items won’t slide out, even if there are a few bumps in the road.

Mount this carrier, which fits a lot more than just letters, on a flat rear bike rack.

Tools and Materials

  • Drill
  • Mailbox, by Gibraltar Industries
  • 6 plastic zip ties
  • Bike, M8 bike in Chartreuse
  • Rear bike rack, in Chartreuse

Mailbox Bike Basket How-To

  1. Drill 6 pairs of holes, centered and evenly spaced, into bottom of mailbox (space holes within each pair about an inch apart). Thread 1 zip tie through each pair of holes.
  2. Place mailbox on bike rack, and use the zip ties to secure it in place. The plastic ties are durable and weatherproof, and will withstand the elements.

Child Safety On The Way To School

On any given day students board school buses to travel to schools. Statistically, school buses are the safest way for students to travel to school — even safer than riding in the family car.
Many students walk to school or to bus stops.
In either case, parents can help to make the trip to school as safe and easy as possible for their children just by discussing a few basic rules:

Walking or riding a bike to school or to a school bus stop:

– Parents should show their children the safe walk path to use and encourage them to fol
low that path.
– Obey all traffic signals, signs, and/or crossing guards. Use crosswalks where available. H Walk bikes through intersec­tions
ffl Walk with a buddy, if pos­sible, and be aware of the sur­roundings.
– Never talk to or respond to strangers. If a stranger ap­proaches or tries to get a child to come to him/her, the child should run home, to a neigh­bor’s house, or another safe place such as a business, and ask an adult for help.
–  Reflective material makes walkers and bicyclists more vis­ible to street traffic. B Always wear a helmet when riding a bike (grownups too).

At the bus stop:

– Know your school bus number.
– Get to the bus stop at least five minutes before the bus is scheduled to arrive. Running to catch the bus is dangerous and can lead to injuries.
– While waiting for the bus, stand at least five giant steps (10 feet) away from the curb and line up away from the street.
– Wait until the bus stops, the door opens, and the driver says it is OK to board before getting onto the bus.
– Students crossing the street in front of the bus should walk on the sidewalk or along the road to a point at least 10 giant steps ahead of the bus before crossing. (Better yet, cross at an intersection and use the cross­walk if one is available.) Be sure that the bus driver can see you and that you can see the driver when crossing the street, and watch for traffic com­ing both ways.
– When you are dropped off at school or at the bus stop, walk 10 giant steps away from the bus. If you need to cross the street, wait until the driver tells you its okay and cross in front of the bus. NEVER walk behind a bus.
– Use the handrail to enter and exit the bus.
– If you drop something near or under the bus, tell the bus driver. DO NOT ATTEMPT TO PICK IT UP because the driver may not be able to see you.
– School buses are loaded or unloaded at established school bus stops only, unless an emergency dictates otherwise.