Christmas Tree Decorating Idea Mickey Mouse On White Tree

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10857798_1533922710189061_576777085322614259_nI have been asked by several comments to give more instructions and to also provide information as to the materials and where we got them.  First the Mickey Mouse was a huge four foot mickey we purchased from a department store during Black Friday. We cut the hands, feet and head off. We took stuffing from the body and stuffed the hands, feet and head so that they were very firm. We sewed the hands, feet, and head closed leaving a small section in the middle for a PVC pipe to be pushed into and secured with E6000. We purchased black and red ornaments that were glass. In hindsight I would have purchased shatterproof because we had a small one in the house and she thought it was just a huge play toy – lots of lessons taught. We purchased wide red ribbon that had the texture of burlap that was red and had glitter on it. We used a six to seven foot white tree that we purchased from a department store which costs about $65.00. We attached the feet and hands to one of the branches coming out of the tree with white twine in several spots to give good anchoring. The head was attached pretty much the same way but it went down at an angle so it got attached to three branches that it was near. The ribbon was tried back through and around the trunk with the bow placed to the front. I also used a couple of twist ties to tie to the branches that were around. I made three holes evenly around the hat and tied white ribbon onto them so the hat could be attached at the top and not come off. Play with the design of the hat – we went back and fourth to decide how it needed to look – completely of the top of tree or just keep above Mickey’s head. Hope this all made sence – but if you have questions please ask within the comments.

Snowman Christmas Month Countdown / Advent Calendar

1378480_971733206190101_8825816831182928791_nThis project requires working with a jigsaw but don’t get scared – it is easy and as you can see with the pic if you mess up a little it still looks cool.

Cut a twelve inch circle (you can buy this from Micheal’s or Hobby Lobby).

Next cut the carrot for the nose.

Next – freestyle cut a hat – use the hat in the picture for an example. Bottom part of hat should be at least ten inches wide.

Paint hat black. Paint head white and carrot orange. When dry you can roughen all fronts with fine sand paper. This gives it a rustic worn appearance. Paint on cheeks with pink. Let dry. Using a sharpie marker add numbers, mouth, eyes. With white paint add the text “Days Til Christmas” on his hat. With the sharpie marker make ridges in carrot. Use a nut and bolt that is just long enough to go through carrot into the back side making sure to add to washers between carrot and face. Epoxy the hat to the head. For additional security use small screws and drill from the back to front to hold hat on.

At this time you also want to make a hanger on the back which you can buy already created or you can use wire around the house. Attach hanger on with screw from the back making sure to get it in the middle of the head. With Sharpie marker make numbers 24 – 1 going clockwise. You may want to add at least one light spray of polyurethane to keep in good shape.

Hang and let your kids have a great time moving the carrot to a new day while they wait for Santa.

Graduation Reece’s Peanut Butter Cup Hat

grad graduation hat favor party parties gift country and victorian timesCut 3″ squares out of black poster board and use a sharpie marker and mark the edges. Use a gold or silver paint pen and trace  a square on top of each square as seen in the picture. Take a six inch length of ribbon (this can be color co-ordinated to work with the schools color just as the black poster board can be changed) and glue it to the top of the black poster board. Hot glue the black square with the square you made on it facing up to the small end of a mini Reece’s Peanut Butter Cup. Top with a small black sequin or bead to cover the glued ends of the ribbon to make a finished look. These would make great party favors or would make a great gift with several placed with tissue paper in a gift box.

Victorian Hats

Throughout the half century, bonnets and hats, apart from sporting styles, were lavishly trimmed, and hair was invariably decorated with flowers, jewels or feathers for evening. Indoor caps were gradually discontinued, by the 1870s worn only, perhaps, with a tea-gown or breakfast jacket and by elderly ladies; servants and country folk wore them well into the 20th century. The variety of millinery styles throughout this period was enormous, and it is only possible to indicate the main shapes, which were dictated by the hairstyles. During the 1850s bonnets became shallower and set further back on the head, developing in the early 1860s into the spoon bonnet, which had a narrow brim close to the ears, rising vertically above the forehead in a spoon-shaped curve and sloping down behind to a very small crown, edged with a bavolet at the back. Bonnet strings (or ribbons) were wide, and often not tied but held by a brooch or pin under the chin, occasionally with a tiny bunch of artificial flowers. A curious addition to the bonnet between 1848 and 1864, appropriately called an ugly, was an extra brim resembling the front of a calash, made of half hoops of cane covered with silk and worn round the front as a protection against the sun; when not in use it could be folded flat. The most romantic-looking hat of the 1850s was a leghorn straw with a very wide brim dipping down at the back and slightly at the front and a high or low crown, trimmed with a lace or tulle veil, ribbons orflowers, or possibly all three; it appears to have been more popular in France and Germany, but was certainly adopted with slight variations in England and America for children’s wear.

With the massive arrangement of hair at the back of the head in the late 1860s and early 1870s, bonnets had to be worn further forward, the front curving fronijust above the hair-line to behind the ears where the ribbons were attached, the back cut away to allow the hair to flow freely. At this time hats were also perched on the forehead; a pillbox shape is sometimes referred to as a casquette, a name also applied to a hat following the lines of the Scotch glengarry cap. The Lamballe bonnet or plateau (named after the Princesse de Lamballe) might be classified as a bonnet or hat – worn in the same way as the pill-box, it closely resembled it but was more oval in shape and tied on by strings under the back hair or chignon or, when curved down slightly at the sides, would have ribbons tied in a large bow under the chin.

Small-brimmed hats, slightly wider in summer, toques and tiny bonnets set on top of the head above the close, high-dressed hair and fringe, helped to increase height in the late 1870s and 1880s; crowns rose, with a flower-pot shape appearing in the late 1880s. Trimmings, arranged to give a vertical line, could be elaborate and even bizarre: small birds, feathers, feather wings, aigrettes, beetles, flowers, fruit and vegetables intermingled with loops of fancy ribbon, velvet and/or tulle. Fur decorated some winter hats, and toques made of sealskin became very popular. At the same time, for country and sporting activities, plainer and rather masculine hats were in vogue. Boaters, introduced as early as the 1860s, continued to be worn, straight or tilted, into the 20th century. The Fedora felt hat, similar to a Homburg, was named after the heroine in a play by Sardou in which Sarah Bernhardt scored a success. Yachting caps were worn for sailing or at the sea-side. The tam-o’-shanter, for country wear, was a soft, round, flat cap or hat with no brim and a bobble in the centre of the crown; in the 1880s it might be made of velvet, plush, cloth or crochet; a knitted version became usual later.

During the 1890s, bonnets lost favour with the fashionable although still worn by some elderly ladies, even after 1900, and for mourning with a long crape veil. Hats became wider-brimmed, worn high on the head over the fuller hairstyle; even toques were often quite large, draped or ruched in velvet, silk or tulle. Trimmings, ribbons, flowers and feathers still emphasized a vertical line

Kwanzaa Kufi – Hat

Materials:

  • Scissors
  • Duck® Tape – Black
  • Duck® Tape – Green
  • Duck® Tape – Red
  • Stickers – Letters
  • Zots™ Glue Dots
  • Buttons of Choice
  • DMC® Needle
  • Floss
  • Ruler
  • Pencil
  • Glue Gun (Adult Use Only)
  • Parchment Paper

Instructions:

  1. Overlap three 24-inch lengths of black duck tape until it is 4 inches wide. Use the parchment paper to build your sheet of tape on.
  2. Flip piece over, remove paper and fold 1 inch from each side. This creates your band.
  3. Overlap two 24-inch lengths of green tape, flip over, remove paper and fold sides to center to create a 1-½ inch green strip.
  4. ADULT: Glue green band to center of black band.
  5. Use letters to add words around band, gluing black buttons between words.
  6. Cut a 12-inch strip of each color, folding to create a 1-inch strips.
  7. Form an X with the colors, stacking them on top each other.
  8. Sew strips together using button to hold. Fan out.
  9. ADULT: Glue your wide black band together.
  10. ADULT: Glue strips to inside band spacing as shown.