Saving Your Pet With CPR

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I am glad I found this graphic because I have never seen such precise information that could literally save your pets life. A valuable guide to print out and share with family and friends to learn how to do CPR on your little ones.

20 Uses For Sea Salt

20 uses for sea salt

Sea salt is kind of pretentious because it’s better than all other salts. If salts were fonts, sea salt would be Helvetica and table salt would be Old English (can you say douchebag?). There isn’t much of a difference, but sea salt is a more natural substance that comes from the sea (duh) rather than the ground, with minimal processing before it hits store shelves. It is made of bigger chunks, meaning it tastes better (and you can use less) and is great for non-food uses, such as cleaning and beauty. Not only do I sprinkle sea salt on baked goods, but I’ve also used it to clean my oven and added it to a homemade body scrub.

Here are my top 20 uses for sea salt.

1. Calm psoriasis and skin inflammation in a sea salt bath or body scrub.
2. After a workout, add to a warm bath to soothe muscles and aches.
3. Add to a facial or skin scrub to slough away dead skin and improve its tone.
4. Sprinkle on baked goods (brownie bites or any other chocolate dessert are a fave) for a light contrast of sweet and salty flavors.
5. Sprinkle on thick meat filets to enhance the flavor and absorption of your marinade.
6. Sprinkle on sliced cucumbers for a fresh, crunchy summer snack. Then dip them in ranch dressing, duh!
7. Add to water when making hardboiled eggs to make them easier to peel (although I prefer the oven method, this still works great).
8. Mix with cinnamon for an easy, natural oven cleaning scrub.
9. Mix with soda water for a refrigerator cleaner.
10. Mix with turpentine for a bathroom and shower cleaner.
11. Relieve a sore throat by gargling sea salt with warm water.
12. Heal fresh body piercings with a warm water and sea salt solution.
13. Fade bruises by soaking a washcloth in a sea salt and warm water solution and applying it to the bruise for a minute or two.
14. Remove blood, red wine, and perspiration stains on clothes by scrubbing with sea salt and hot water.
15. Whiten your clothes by boiling them in water, baking soda, and sea salt for an hour. Follow up by washing them as normal.
16. Brighten your teeth by brushing them with one part sea salt and 2 parts baking soda.
17. Alleviate the pain of a bug bite or sting by soaking it in a warm water and sea salt solution.
18. Rinse your sinus cavities with sea salt and warm water in a Neti Pot.
19. Add one eighth of a teaspoon of a sea salt to a glass of water on really hot days to decrease dehydration.
20. Volumize your hair by mixing one part hair conditioner with one part sea salt, coating your strands with it, leaving it on for 20 minutes, and rinsing.

Rice Water For Tummy Problems

Originally posted at: http://foodstorageandsurvival.com/how-to-make-rice-water/

rice water

Making rice water is really easy and uses ingredients right out of your food storage. Rice water is useful when somebody is having stomach issues like vomiting or diarrhea. It is calming to the upset stomach, amazingly bland, starchy, and gets some nutrients in your patient.

To make rice water you need rice and water, that’s all.  Put two tablespoons of rice in a pot with 1 cup of water.  Don’t add salt.  You don’t get a cup of rice water from a cup of water because some of it soaks into the rice.   I double or triple this and refrigerate the leftovers.

Bring the water to a boil and boil until the rice is tender. Strain the rice out and the milky liquid that is left is rice water.  You can eat the rice, add it to a soup or casserole, or feed it to the chickens if you want.  If you boil too long, your rice water will be pretty thick.  You can just thin it back down with some regular water if it’s thicker than you’d like.

Let the rice water cool before serving it to your patient. You can drink it warm or cold.  Great for queasy tummies young or old.

Home Made Doggie Bisquits

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These are a healthier choice for your doggie -doggie treats bought from a store are usually sent here from a foreign country that has no standards for what is put into the treats. Home made allows you to know what has been put into the recipe to keep your doggie from having chemicals and unhealthy leftovers from the processing of animal meat.

2 eggs
1/2 cup canned pumpkin
2 tablespoons dry milk
1/4 teaspoon sea salt
2 1/2 cups brown rice flour *
1 teaspoon dried parsley (optional)

Preheat oven to 350.

In large bowl, whisk together eggs and pumpkin to smooth. Stir in dry milk, sea salt, and dried parsley (if using, optional). Add brown rice flour gradually, combining with spatula or hands to form a stiff, dry dough. Turn out onto lightly floured surface (can use the brown rice flour) and if dough is still rough, briefly knead and press to combine.

Roll dough between 1/4 – 1/2″ – depending on your dog’s chew preferences, – and use biscuit or other shape cutter to punch shapes, gathering and re-rolling scraps as you go. Place shapes on cookie sheet, no greasing or paper necessary. If desired, press fork pattern on biscuits before baking, a quick up-and-down movement with fork, lightly pressing down halfway through dough. Bake 20 minutes. Remove from oven and carefully turn biscuits over, then bake additional 20 minutes. Allow to cool completely on rack before feeding to dog.

* Brown rice flour gives the biscuits crunch and promotes better dog digestion. Many dogs have touchy stomachs or allergies, and do not, like many people I know, tolerate wheat.

Makes up to 75 small (1″) biscuits or 50 medium biscuits