Pet Overpopulation

4.1.1Spaying or neutering your dog or cat is considered one of the most effective ways to reduce pet overpopulation. That’s the word from experts such as the American Veterinary Medical Association. They also say the procedure is safe for even younger animals than ever before.

In addition to pet population control, spaying a female cats or dogs before her first heat cycle amplifies a number of health benefits. It reduces a number of mammary gland and reproductive cancers as well as potentially fatal infections.

Additional benefits include:

*Reduced aggression: Cats and dogs that have been spayed or neutered are less aggressive than animals that have not.

*Less wandering: Animals that are not fixed are more likely to stray from home (especially cats) especially when they are in heat and looking for a mate.

*Less marking: Animals often ‘claim’ their territory by marking urine – even if that territory is your couch or rug. After a spay/neuter procedure animals become much less territorial and this behavior decreases dramatically.

Many believe that late winter or early spring are the most effective times to spay or neuter because the timing is typically prior to an animal’s cycle.

CREDIT: New Mexico Marketplace. (2015, March). Ending Pet Overpopulation. New Mexico Marketplace, p. 6.

 

 

Home Made Doggie Bisquits

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These are a healthier choice for your doggie -doggie treats bought from a store are usually sent here from a foreign country that has no standards for what is put into the treats. Home made allows you to know what has been put into the recipe to keep your doggie from having chemicals and unhealthy leftovers from the processing of animal meat.

2 eggs
1/2 cup canned pumpkin
2 tablespoons dry milk
1/4 teaspoon sea salt
2 1/2 cups brown rice flour *
1 teaspoon dried parsley (optional)

Preheat oven to 350.

In large bowl, whisk together eggs and pumpkin to smooth. Stir in dry milk, sea salt, and dried parsley (if using, optional). Add brown rice flour gradually, combining with spatula or hands to form a stiff, dry dough. Turn out onto lightly floured surface (can use the brown rice flour) and if dough is still rough, briefly knead and press to combine.

Roll dough between 1/4 – 1/2″ – depending on your dog’s chew preferences, – and use biscuit or other shape cutter to punch shapes, gathering and re-rolling scraps as you go. Place shapes on cookie sheet, no greasing or paper necessary. If desired, press fork pattern on biscuits before baking, a quick up-and-down movement with fork, lightly pressing down halfway through dough. Bake 20 minutes. Remove from oven and carefully turn biscuits over, then bake additional 20 minutes. Allow to cool completely on rack before feeding to dog.

* Brown rice flour gives the biscuits crunch and promotes better dog digestion. Many dogs have touchy stomachs or allergies, and do not, like many people I know, tolerate wheat.

Makes up to 75 small (1″) biscuits or 50 medium biscuits