50 Photos To Take With Your Children

9370_627723203924438_135862117_nI have actually used this list to take a few of these photos. Some can be very dramatic. My wife and I took a photo of our hands and rings in front of her wedding dress and we took pictures of our children with our hands with theirs and also our hands together over time. It shows our age as wrinkles and rough skin show over time but it still shows the love we had is still there just like it was over a decade ago.

Some of these are a bit special and you may not even think about taking pictures of these special moments – but why not? So many people focus on taking pictures of just the special events like birthdays, Christmas, sporting event, choir, etc. But why not take pictures of your kids sleeping and of you both eating ice cream, or of them eating something messy and allowing kids to be kids.

I recently purchased a cell phone that can take really good photographs so when i am out and about (especially with the kids) I can take photos of them doing what kids do. Photos even in a store capturing a special moment can be a great picture.

…. and one of the best reasons to have a digital camera is that you can take several photos – come on – you are not wasting anything. We always take about five of each posed photo and I am known to take photos in succession. Then when you upload them on the computer you can delete ones that are not just right. Also keep your photos that arnt just right in a yearly ‘bloopers’ file. These can be really entertaining made into a ‘bloopers’ slideshow for everyone to watch.

Love this picture of a newborn with the Dad's and Mom's hands to either side and their rings placed on the toes of the wee one. A true symbol of their love.

Love this picture of a newborn with the Dad’s and Mom’s hands to either side and their rings placed on the toes of the wee one. A true symbol of their love.

CD Cover Picture Frames

cd cas picture frame gift mom dad grandma fun craft project PARENTS ROOM

These frames are easy to make for gifts and can contain a 2 pictures or artwork from a little one. You can obtain these at almost any stores these days and they are really cheap. You take the cardboard insert out and are going to use this as a guide to get a photo or a piece of artwork. If you want to print a photo out measure this and take the dimensions to your desktop publisher to prepare image for printing. If you are doing this from artwork or a photo already printed trace this onto your photo or artwork and cut out. If the photo or artwork isn’t big enough you can add a border to create a tight fit. On the outside you can glue jewels, sewing notions, stickers etc. You can do this on both sides  and can add embellishments around the edges.

PICTURE FROM: FaceBook Parent’s Room

Victorian Caged Grave

Although this is a bit different from what I usually post, I came upon this picture on the internet and just had to share. I have read and watched a lot on the subject of the undead and vampires, and even read about this cage over graves before. However, I have never actually seen a picture of one before and found it unique. So, I know what your asking, “so what does this have to do with this site and why is it posted?” Well, it has to do with the Victorian era and all of their superstitions and what we now know of as irrational fears.

The caged grave as seen above was used to prevent one of two things. 1: If you were to come back alive and become a walking undead then you wouldn’t be able to remove yourself from this cage and you could be dealt with. 2: If you were a vampire the same situation would apply to you.

I find death during the Victorian era to be fascinating, they seemed to have a love affair with death at least from an onlooker some 100 years in the future. Did you know that many peoples only photograph was taken AFTER they died. Yes, if you came from a poor family and you died, your family could scrape enough money together to have a memorial photo of you by yourself or your body could be “staged” to be in a family photo. This included babies and older folks and these photos were kept in a memorial album.

A memorial album was basically a scrapbook of photos of the deceased. You see, you would have photos of your loved ones, but you would also have memorial cards sent to you with the photos of the deceased person on the front announcing their death. Since everything delivered was delivered very slowly back then from one area of the country to another it might be weeks before you found out someone related to you died. This would announce their death but would give you a keepsake of their death and it would be added to your memorial photo album.

Many of these photos are sought after by collectors and can go for large sums of money. Especially sought after are entire albums, photos that are metal and those of young children and babies.

A good source of these pictures may be found at http://memorialphotosofthedead.wordpress.com/ and if you venture there please be advised as to what you will see. There are photos from the Victorian era as well as posed photos of gunned down armed robbers and pictures of famous people who have died since the Victorian era.

The Victorian era is filled with mysterious ideals and love for long forgotten traditions, still some we are using today.

Distressing Techniques

Distress Inks have been specially formulated to produce an aged look on papers, photos, fibers and more. These inks are not “better” than other inks; they just work completely “different” for the purpose of creating an aged look.

Here are some key points that make Distress Inks different:

STAYS WET LONGER ; the Distress Ink formulation allows blending and shading on photos and paper, as well as embossing! Other dye inks dry too fast, especially on photos which would result in lines and marks for direct to paper techniques.  Not with Distress Inks!

COLOR WICKS OR SPREADS OUT – these inks will travel across the surface of your paper when spritzed with water; other dyes do not travel as much although they might bleed a little when wet, the Distress Inks actually “wick” or spread out much further creating several tone on tones.

COLOR STABILITY – the colors of the Distress Inks will not break down when wet or heated allowing you to have more color control for the finished look;  other “brown colored” dyes will break down when water is added leaving a pink & green hue.

COLOR PALETTE – Well these are unlike ANY other colors of inks you’ve seen!

*Antique Linen: the color of aged lace or linens found in the cherished heirlooms of grandmother’s trunk.

*Tea Dye: the orange hue of saturated tea bags with the results of dying in a tea bath for days.

*Vintage Photo: this color is captured right out of the photographs from times gone by.

*Walnut Stain: a rich, dark stain of an old walnut tree perfect to create a dark wash of color

* Fired Brick: the look of charred cinders from an old camp fire

* Weathered Wood: the patina on a dairy barn’s window frame

TO DISTRESS: I like to use water when I am distressing.  I think it gives the papers more of a weathered texture, so here’s how I start.

Working on any type of paper (manila, card stock, or text weight), crumple the paper up – always press in the center of any heavyweight card stock or manila stock – this will break the surface tension of the paper and allow you to crumple up the paper easier without tearing it.

Next rub the Distress pads over the surface – you can work with several different colors or just one – WALNUT STAIN IS IDEAL FOR THIS.

Then spray the inked surface with water (you will immediately notice the ink “travels” outward when water is applied as these inks are designed to react with water).

Heat the surface to dry – and here’s why…  Although you don’t have to Heat Set these inks for any reason, I like to dry the water using either my Heat Tool or a craft iron.  This will allow for more tone control and keep areas dark and others light.  Ironing the paper will also give you a much smoother surface to stamp on without compromising the aged finish.

Note: If you allow the surface to air-dry most of your color will end up on the edges only because the paper will bend and buckle when wet, forcing the ink and water to the edges.  Notice that these Distress Inks retain their color value even when wet and dried.  Other brown dyes will break down in color (sometimes leaving a pink and green hue).

FOR STAMPING:  What can I say about the many stamping applications these inks can achieve.  Once again the special formulation on these Distress Inks provides a versatile finish on papers yet still allow for “normal” stamping applications.  I like to stamp on uncoated (matte) papers and immediately rub the image with a cloth – this will soften or shadow your image WITHOUT smudging any detail, VINTAGE PHOTO, WALNUT STAIN and TEA DYE are wonderful for this one!  Another surface is glossy card stock – keep in mind this is a different type of dye ink so when you stamp on glossy, certain areas of your image will “bead” up, once again providing a Distressed look without you doing a thing (this is probably one of my most favorite looks) – some areas of the image appear “pitted”.  Brayering on glossy cardstock is also wonderful because you can still manipulate the inks with different tools, brushes, fingers, whatever.  Even after the ink is applied you can achieve amazing texture and color shading.

ON PHOTOS:  Finally an ink formulated for photos!  Whether you’re a scrapbooker or not you can use all types of photos (vintage or new ones) on your cards and pages.  Distress Inks work on MOST types of black and white photos – inkjet, laser, toner copies, and regular photos. Always test the type of photo paper and printer first!!!

Tinting Photos:

*Tint your photos using your choice of Distress Ink colors and the Cut n’ Dry Nibs.

* Drag the nib across the Distress pad to pick up ink and color directly on to your photo using the nib ; the inks blend without leaving any lines.

* For larger background areas, tint the photo using a cosmetic make up sponge or craft sponge.

* Tap the foam on to the Distress pad and wipe inks on to your photo.  Repeat for desired look.

Distressing Photos:

* To Distress, begin with the lightest colors ANTIQUE LINEN only (direct to photo).  Cover the photo in the lighter color. ; THIS WILL NOT SMEAR ANY OF THE DISTRESS INKS COLORS YOU TINTED WITH!

*Blend the photo with a clean piece of foam or cosmetic make up sponge immediately after applying ink.

*Next, age the edges with VINTAGE PHOTO or WALNUT STAIN by applying the ink with foam or cosmetic make up sponge.