Victorian Caged Grave

Although this is a bit different from what I usually post, I came upon this picture on the internet and just had to share. I have read and watched a lot on the subject of the undead and vampires, and even read about this cage over graves before. However, I have never actually seen a picture of one before and found it unique. So, I know what your asking, “so what does this have to do with this site and why is it posted?” Well, it has to do with the Victorian era and all of their superstitions and what we now know of as irrational fears.

The caged grave as seen above was used to prevent one of two things. 1: If you were to come back alive and become a walking undead then you wouldn’t be able to remove yourself from this cage and you could be dealt with. 2: If you were a vampire the same situation would apply to you.

I find death during the Victorian era to be fascinating, they seemed to have a love affair with death at least from an onlooker some 100 years in the future. Did you know that many peoples only photograph was taken AFTER they died. Yes, if you came from a poor family and you died, your family could scrape enough money together to have a memorial photo of you by yourself or your body could be “staged” to be in a family photo. This included babies and older folks and these photos were kept in a memorial album.

A memorial album was basically a scrapbook of photos of the deceased. You see, you would have photos of your loved ones, but you would also have memorial cards sent to you with the photos of the deceased person on the front announcing their death. Since everything delivered was delivered very slowly back then from one area of the country to another it might be weeks before you found out someone related to you died. This would announce their death but would give you a keepsake of their death and it would be added to your memorial photo album.

Many of these photos are sought after by collectors and can go for large sums of money. Especially sought after are entire albums, photos that are metal and those of young children and babies.

A good source of these pictures may be found at http://memorialphotosofthedead.wordpress.com/ and if you venture there please be advised as to what you will see. There are photos from the Victorian era as well as posed photos of gunned down armed robbers and pictures of famous people who have died since the Victorian era.

The Victorian era is filled with mysterious ideals and love for long forgotten traditions, still some we are using today.

“Country Victorian” Decorating

Victorian Era style reflects home decor during the reign of Queen Victoria from 1837 – 1910. “Country Victorian” focuses primarily on the feel and look of Victorian countryside summer homes. While this decorating style is very similar to traditional Victorian decor, it incorporates a more airy and relaxing feel.

Colors: “Country Victorian” decor incorporates a variety of colors such as pastel pinks, greens, blues, and peaches. These can be paired with darker hues of mauve and incorporate the occasional navy, indigo, or deep forest green. “Country Victorian” homes often inspire picturesque images of the countryside or seaside. Pick an idyllic image of a rustic vacation spot and use this to influence your color selections. Sea foam green and varying shades of blue with a touch of peach will invoke an image of the seaside while pink, mauve, mint green, and forest green will speak of a countryside filled with flowers growing down a rolling hillside. Rich patterns are common in Victorian home decor on everything from the furniture to the wallpaper.

Materials: “Country Victorian” decor typically uses lots of lush and luxurious fabrics such as silk, velvet and lace. Your “Country Victorian” home should still have an abundant supply of interesting fabrics, but you should not to use those with a light and airy feel such as cottons and chintz. Use lace or gauzy fabrics at the windows to let plenty of sunlight in. Embroidered blankets, rugs, pillows, and throws will lend to the Victorian feel and look of the home. Tassels and ribbons

are also distinctly Victorian. Furniture with a lacquered grained wood finish will give the home a bit of a rustic feel. Wicker is another material frequently associated with “Country Victorian” homes. Couches and chairs should be plump and a bit overstuffed.

Accessories: In a “Country Victorian” style home, it is the little touches that often bring the look together. Victorian decor is often associated with a business and somewhat cluttered look. Placing antique items and Victorian era prints and artwork throughout the home will complete your “Country Victorian” theme. Dried flowers are a popular feature in homes of this style. Nature-inspired knickknacks such as seashells and pebbles work with this theme as well. Opt for pewter and brass light fixtures. Painted plates and porcelain dogs and other small creatures are fine finishing touches for a “Country Victorian” home.

Victorian Purse History

It is hard to understand Victorian era purses without first understanding Queen Victoria and her long rein over England. Her influence was so pronounced that it greatly affected styles and her middle class attitude was reflected in fashion.
Queen Victoria reined from 1837 to 1901 and took over control of England at the age of 18. She was very headstrong and began rejecting the advice of her equally headstrong mother, who had a great deal of control over her life up to this point.
Prime Minister Lord Melbourne began to exert influence on her views until 1840, when Queen Victoria married her cousin Prince Albert. They proceeded to have 9 children.
The Queen’s values were reflected in the Victorian purse of this era. Life was relatively stable and England enjoyed expanding prosperity. Of course there was a wide discrepancy between the upper middle class and the poor and fashion was important to the “haves” as opposed to the “have nots”.
There was a large variety of victorian purses popular during the rein of Queen Victoria so generalizations are needed. Needle skills were valued and this was reflected in decorative designs in beadwork and ribbonwork. Magazines that gave instructions on how to make these bags were very popular.
Knitted bags and chatelaine bags became the rage around 1870 and melded beautifully with women’s fashionable dresses at that time which were slim fitting. The chatelaine bag was hung either from the wrist or the waist.
When women traveled, a large bag with a metal frames called the Gladstone bag after Queen Victoria’s Prime Minister William Gladstone was used. This was an example of a specialized bag for a special need and some popular Victorian purses were used exclusively for going to the opera as well as traveling toilet bags.
The Victorian purse encompassed many different styles over Queen Victoria’s long rein but her own personality was incorporated in the fashion of her day. Her sensibilities gave England it’s own direction in design as this prosperous country enjoyed it’s rule over the empire of style.

Victorian Ivory Silk Shoes

These Ivory silk shoes with low heels, ribbon and lace rosettes are from the mid-19th century and were part of H. M. Queen Alexandra’s trousseau. Princess Alexandra of Denmark married Prince Albert Edward, son of Queen Victoria and heir to her throne, in 1863. Together they had six children, including Princess Maud Charlotte Mary Victoria who became the queen consort of Norway. After Queen Victoria’s death in 1901, Prince Edward ascended to the throne as King Edward VII.