Simple Home Maintenance Tips By Guest Writer Emily Bennett

Although you may be tempted to avoid the prices of professional contractors, you will often need their help in dealing with maintenance and home improvement. Home repairs and maintenance can turn out to be trick and complex for those with no experience of their own, so it is likely you may do more harm than good. If you don’t have the experience you can do some simple maintenance done by following these tips:

 

  • The Toilet

Simple Home Maintenance TipsAny water leaking from the tank in your toilet and going down the drain results in money literally going down the drain as well. This can have variations, such as dealing different levels of water damage to your bathroom as well. If you want to find whether your toilet is leaking, then you should add a bit of food coloring to the tank itself. Come back after an hour or so and check the color of the water in the bowl. If you find out the toilet is leaking, then you will need to replace the flapper or seals. Remember to shut off the water so you’ll be able to work in peace. Flush the toilet so the tank will be empty and dismantle the mechanism so you’ll be able to change the flapper. Place the new one on and replace everything the way it was before turning the water back on.

 

If the faucets around your home are leaking, this means you have washers that have been worn out with use. These types of seals are used inside the handles of your faucets, but in most cases they are made of rubber which wears out quickly. You should replace them by once again closing the main water supply, then unscrewing the handle and replacing the old washer with a new one so it will seal properly.

 

  • The Washing Machine and Dryer

You should check your washing machine on a regular basis for any possible leaks or other mechanical issues. You should keep in mind that the most commonly used reason for insurance claims is the possible leaks in the machine’s water supply. Check the water lines at least once a year and replace them if you see evidence of any corrosion or leaks. You should check for possible discoloration of metal pipes as this may indicate issues that need to be addressed. The drain hoses of your washing machine are very important as they are pretty much one of the few things that stops the water flow from invading your floors. Simple Home Maintenance Tips2

You should also see how well the drain lines are fitted by using pliers to check the tension. You should make sure they are tightened up until you can’t tighten any more. Any plastic lines should be replaced every three years or so.

 

The dryer on the other hand will need to be cleaned from lint as often as possible, otherwise you risk letting it collect and heat up until the point of ignition. Regular cleaning will also prolong the life of the heating elements inside.

 

This article has been created by Emily Bennett on behalf of: Movers London

DIY Olympic Rings Necklace

DIY Olympic Rings Necklace

by Beth on June 28, 2012

I’m so excited to share this craft with you today!

We’re starting to get a little excited about the Olympics over here. We aren’t a big sports family, but RD Husband has one sister who was an athlete in the Olympics in 1988 and another who has coached Olympic teams. So we have a soft spot for the games.

This necklace is easy and inexpensive to make. Here’s what you’ll need.

  1. Cord in 5 different colors: red, green, yellow, blue, and black. I used Chinese knotting cord in micro size G, which I ordered from here. You could also use crochet thread, embroidery thread, or embroidery floss, all of which are readily available at craft stores.
  2. 26 Gauge Wire
  3. G-S Hypo Cement, or another strong jewelry-type glue. Michaels carries Aleene’s or E-6000, which both should work.
  4. 5 rings (I actually bought a cheap Claire’s Accessories necklace and took it apart, but you can find these at Michaels in different sizes, too).
  5. A few binder clips
  6. Chain in desired length. I used about 17″, divided into two lengths of 8.5″. You could get something simple and inexpensive like this, or check out a jewelry supplier like Rio Grande or Fire Mountain Gems.
  7. Two jump rings and one clasp. (The clasp isn’t pictured. Sorry!)

Most, if not all, of these things can be found at Michaels or JoAnn Fabric.

First step is covering your rings in the cord. You want to attach the cord with glue at the beginning, wrapping it a few times around.

Secure it by clipping a small binder clip over it and let it dry for about 15 minutes. You can prep all your rings this way, and by the time you are done with the last one, the first one should be dry enough to work with.

Now, wrap the cord around the ring, keeping it tight and each coil snug against the previous one. You don’t want to see any metal through the wrapping.

In order to keep the right tension, you’ll need to hold the parts you’ve already wrapped tightly while you wrap more.

Stop wrapping with about a quarter of an inch or so left to go.

Now, place more jewelry glue on the exposed metal, and then continue wrapping until you have covered the ring. Don’t worry about the long ends of the cord just yet. Secure this section with your binder clip and let it dry.

You’ll do this for each ring in each different color cord. Once they’ve dried (I let mine sit overnight just to be certain), you can clip the cords close to the ring. I chose a side I wanted to be the “back” and clipped them both on that side, so the edges wouldn’t show. Although if you’ve glued enough, the edges will sort of blend together with the ring.

Sorry for the blurry photo!

Once you have all your rings, it’s time to lay them out in the correct pattern. Check online and look at images to get your order correct. Then, you are going to start wiring them together.

Cut a small length of wire, about 3″ long, and place it over one of the connections between rings.

Turn to the back, and twist the two wires together, like twist ties. You can use your fingers, or if you have needle nose pliers, those work well, too.

You’ll twist until the connected wires are about 1/4″ long, and then snip the wires off. Fold them under and towards the rings so that they don’t stick out, but keep them hidden in the back.

Once you get a few together, it’ll look like this:

Make sure you are wiring them tightly together so that they keep their shape.

You’ll want to make attachments at all these points:

When you’re done, it’ll look like this:

Then, you just need to attach the chain with the jump rings to the blue and red circles.

Attach your clasp, and your necklace is done!

Originally posted: http://remarkablydomestic.com/2012/06/28/diy-olympic-rings-necklace/

Victorian Chrstmas Greeting Card History

Children in Victorian England had the task of writing greetings to their parents in their very best handwriting. Sometimes adults wrote Christmas letters to each other, but this could take up a great deal of time. The printed Christmas card solved the problem. The custom of sending printed cards was started in England by Henry Cole, who did not have time to write letters to each of his relatives. He asked an artist, John Calcott Horsley, to design a card for him. About 1,000 of these cards were printed, and those not used by Sir Henry were sold by the printer for one shilling. This was not cheap, which may be why they did not sell very well. With the introduction of the “penny post” in 1840, it became cheaper to send mail, and as a result of color printing and the invention of printing machines, cards could be printed faster and cheaper. The first company to print and sell Christmas cards on a large scale was Charles Goodall & Sons of London in 1862. The first charity card was produced in 1949 by UNICEF. Richard H. Pease, a printer from Albany, New York, is credited with sending the first specially printed Christmas card in America, in 1851. It managed to make the first mistake in Christmas card history. The card showed a building on which was hung a banner proclaiming “Pease’s Great Variety Store.”