4 Different Ways To Get Started With Gardening

Gardening is so rewarding. Not only do you get to experience the joy of bringing a seed to life, but you can also stock your kitchen with homegrown treats and elevate your home decor!

To the uninitiated, beginning a garden can seem like a daunting task. The truth is that you don’t need a huge yard or years of experience to get started. If you’re interested in developing your green thumb, try these beginner-friendly gardening ideas.

  1. Pallet Garden

If you don’t have a lot of outdoor space to work with, a pallet garden is a wonderful option. Whether you live in a dense city or you’re looking for a unique way to make the most of your side yard, you’ll find that the vertical nature of a pallet garden is absolutely perfect for tight quarters.

As you might assume, the structure of your garden comes from an ordinary wooden pallet. The pallet acts as a frame, holding whatever plants you decide to stuff it with. The best part of pallet gardens is that you can be so creative with it. Stain the wood and fill it with herbs for a rustic, bucolic look, or paint it your favorite color and load it up with flowers for a fun spring/summer vibe.

  1. Bins, Buckets, and Barrels

 

If you’re interested in adding some greenery to your life, but you don’t want to bother with repotting plants as they outgrow their pots, try using some oversized storage containers. Buckets, barrels, and bins are all great choices that are easy to find and have plenty of room for growth. Simply fill them with soil, plant your seeds, and follow some basic gardening tips, and you’ll have your own self-contained garden in no time!

The great thing about this approach is that it’s easy to customize and expand over time. The containers give you a self-contained version of a large garden so you can decide if gardening is for you without committing to the real thing just yet. Growing plants in oversized containers is kind of like a cross between potted plants and a real garden—it’s the best of both worlds!

  1. Your Special Corner

For many would-be gardeners, the idea of starting and maintaining a garden is just too big. If you feel overwhelmed, just find a small, outdoor corner, dig it up, throw down some soil, and then put down some stone garden markers to make it official. If you have any pets, be aware of any potentially poisonous plants, and consider putting up a fence.

Even if your corner only has enough space for a person to sit down, you might be surprised by the amount of plant life you can grow. This approach works well because you can really focus on each individual plant. After all, you’re not a full-blown farmer just yet! Your little corner is a backyard oasis where you can get your feet wet without making a major commitment. Maybe next year, you’ll have two corners!

  1. Tin Cans in the Window

All you need is some tin cans, seeds, soil, and sunlight to start your very own indoor herb garden! If shoveling and raking isn’t your cup of tea, you can still enjoy the magic of gardening from the comfort of your couch.

Herbs need to be grown in containers that provide good drainage, so drill a few holes in the bottoms of your cans (or any other small container you prefer). Try using a variety of shapes and sizes—coffee cans make great centerpieces alongside classic tin cans. You can paint them or remove the label for a surprisingly elegant metal look. Prevent water leakage by placing a liner, saucer, or even paper towels underneath the containers.

Now, you simply fill your containers with soil, plant your seeds, label them, and place them in your windowsill. Make sure you check each herb’s water and sun requirements. Most will need at least around 4-6 hours of sunlight daily, and most should be watered when the soil is dry to the touch. Here are some of the most popular herbs for growing indoors all year-round:

  • Basil
  • Parsley
  • Oregano
  • Rosemary
  • Sage
  • Tarragon
  • Thyme
  • Chives
  • Chervil

Have Fun and Be Creative

There you have it—four easy garden ideas that are simple to start and maintain. The best part about gardening is that you can put your heart and soul into it. It’s not just about having some pretty flowers or tasty veggies to enjoy. Savor the journey. Gardening is your chance to wield the power of nature and create something truly unique and beautiful. Let your personality shine!

Author Bio: Katie Tejada is a writer, editor, and former HR professional. She enjoys writing about events, travel, decorating trends, and innovations for the home, but also covers developments in HR, business communication, recruiting, real estate, and finance.

Composting

Making a pot of coffee every morning can get you well on your way to a perfect compost. Enjoy a crisp salad for lunch, and the prettiest plants are in your reach.

So what does cooking have to do with composting? Everything. All those nutrient – rich scraps you’re sscraping into the disposal or trash can are full of food for your soil. Change where you’re putting them – not into the garbage, but into a compost bucket.

And let’s lay your fears to rest: Done right, it won’t stink or attract bugs.

I recommend a compost bucket with a double filter in the lid, which keeps odors contained. For easy cleanup, line your pail with a biobag. Made from starch, it breaks down in the compost bin outside.

To keep it simple, whenever you take out the trash, empty the compost bucket into your outdoor bin. In less than two month, you’ll be rewarded with compost.

ADD:

vegetables, grains, pasta, fruit rinds and peels, breads, cereals, coffee grounds and filters, tea bags, crushed eggshells, paper napkins or towels – and don’t forget to add lawn products such as leaves, grass and bush trimmings – and don’t throw away those paper shredings from your office shredder…. they can go in the compost also or you can spread across your garden right on top to help keep moisture in your garden where it belongs.

DO NOT ADD:

meat, fish, poultry, cheese, oily foods, butter, other animal products and never put in yard trimmings that are weeds or anything with roots