How To Move To A New House Like A Pro

When you’re moving into a new house, there’s a lot to think about. While we generally think of moving processes like packing and unpacking as the only main roadblocks to properly settling in, the things you do after you move into a new house are what make the largest impact.

Of course, you already have a lot on your plate. So, to help you organize your to-do list, we’ve compiled a fast list of the ten most important things to accomplish when moving into a new house. The majority of these tasks aren’t time consuming, but they do demand you to make a conscious effort to complete them. Read on to learn what you need to know, then make a strategy. Soon, you’ll be able to relax, crack open a bottle of champagne, and toast your new home.

1. Perform a walkthrough

When your new house is absolutely vacant, there is no better opportunity to undertake a comprehensive walkthrough. Take a look around before setting up your furniture and getting unpacked. You’ll want to double-check that: 

  • The previous owner has completed all required and agreed-upon repairs 
  • Everything that was supposed to be included in the transaction is present in the house 
  • All outlets, switches, and fixtures are in good working condition.

If you discover something that violates the sale contract (for example, the previous owner took the washer and dryer with them when they were supposed to leave them behind), contact your agent right away to see what options you have. Issues that you discover that were not covered by your contract are now your problem, but knowing what they are can assist.

2. Figure out where everything is going

When moving into a new house, establishing a plan of attack for putting everything up rather than winging it will save you a lot of time and headache. 

This is especially true for goods that are large and heavy, such as furniture. 

While you undoubtedly already have a general sense of what belongs in whatever room, take a minute to consider how you’d like the setup to appear. 

Of course, you may make adjustments afterwards, but approaching this activity with a basic strategy will always make the process easier.

3. Confirm that your utilities are operational

Hopefully, you took care of getting your utilities set up before moving into your new house, in which case, now is the time to double-check that everything is in working order. 

Check your electric, gas, water, heating and cooling, phone, and internet connections on moving day. Then contact your local waste management facility to make sure your new house is also set up for rubbish collection. 

If you’re having troubles moving try hiring Pinnacle Removalists to avoid stress and have experts do the whole moving process for you.

4. Find the water valve and fuse box

The fuse box and the water valve are two items you don’t want to be hunting for when you need them the most. It’s far better to locate them now, so that if your electricity goes out or you need to cut off the water for whatever reason, you’ll be able to get there quickly. 

Your fuse box will most likely be in your basement, garage, or storage area, whereas your home’s water valve will most likely be positioned someplace around the perimeter of your property.

5. Perform a thorough cleaning

Cleaning your new house from top to bottom may be the last thing on your mind after going through the moving process, but it is the greatest time to do it. 

Fortunately, we’ve put up a new house thorough cleaning guide to assist you. Consider hiring professional cleaners instead if you don’t have the time or interest to put on your cleaning gloves and grab a mop right now (we don’t blame you). Starting life in your new house in a clean condition is more than worth it, whether you invest in time or money.

6. Replace your locks

Changing the locks on your new house is always a smart idea. Even if the former owner isn’t a worry, you never know who could have a key.

 It’s best to be safe than sorry in this case, so call a locksmith or change the locks yourself if you’re comfortable doing so. Rekey the locks on all doors going from the inside to the outside of your house, as well as the windows. It’s a tiny price to pay for a lot of assurance.

7. Modify Your Address

You may have already notified the post office of your change of address prior to moving day, but if you haven’t, now is the time.

 Friends and relatives, subscription services, your bank, any loan providers, and anybody else who sends you regular communication or invoices should all be informed of your relocation. 

A comprehensive list of who should be notified may be seen here. If you’ve relocated to a new state, you’ll need to contact your state’s department of motor vehicles to get a new driver’s license and updated car registration.

Moving into a new house is naturally stressful, but following the 10 steps outlined above can make the process go more smoothly. However, there is a lot to do, so don’t be hesitant to ask for assistance, whether from a friend or family member or from a professional service provider. The sooner you can deal with the major issues, the sooner your new house will begin to feel like a home.

Disaster Proofing Your House

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Your home is your sanctuary. It is the place that you’ve put a lot of time and attention into making a safe, comfortable environment for you and your family. This is why the prospect of a natural disaster causing damage or disruption to your house can be so upsetting. 

No-one likes to dwell on this possibility, of course. However, even if you aren’t living in an area that has frequent earthquakes or storms, that doesn’t mean to say that your home is immune to emergencies. The World Economic Forum recently reported that extreme weather events are occurring more frequently, and they are likely to continue causing severe damage and destruction in the future. This rise has also been linked to the growing effects of climate change. As such, it is imperative for the continued safety of yourself and your family that you take steps to ensure that your home is protected from disasters.  

This is all very well to say, but it’s not always easy to know how to go about doing this practically. It’s certainly a wide-ranging area, but we’re going to take a moment to guide you through a few main points for your attention. How can you best act to protect your home, and sleep soundly at night, safe in the knowledge that you’ve done all you can to keep your family safe? 

Audit Current Issues

Whether you’ve purchased a home with the specific intention to renovate, or you bought a new build, an audit is essential. Why? Well, in most cases, the pre-purchasing property survey that was undertaken at the time would have been geared toward determining the general safety of the home. Indeed, when buying a home, people are usually on the lookout for common trouble areas — existing water damage, pest issues, or health hazards. As such, you are unlikely to have the data you need to understand how well-prepped your home is to withstand an unexpected natural disaster.  

It can be a good first step to review the types of natural disasters that may be most likely to occur in your area. After all, it’s not wise to disaster-proof your home for earthquakes if you are not in a risk location. Review recent years’ weather and emergency events — has there been an uptick in any activity? The Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) keeps statistics for all reported disasters, which can help guide you. However, it can be just as useful to talk to neighbors and local emergency services personnel about what you should be aware of.

Using this knowledge, undertake a review of your home. You can do this personally if you feel confident doing so — identifying all the areas that may leave your home vulnerable or dangerous. Use ready-made checklists to review systems like electrical and plumbing. It can also be helpful to engage a contractor here. That way you not only benefit from their assessment expertise, but can also arrange for any repairs to be made, or at least make a plan for the future that fits your budget. 

Alternative Utilities

Disasters don’t just affect the integrity of your home. In a lot of cases, they may impact the infrastructure that allows you to maintain a safe and operational house. There may be direct contact with your property that causes utility outages, or there may be a problem further down the line that affects you. If you live in a remote area, it may take a long time for your services to be restored. It can therefore be appropriate to look into alternative solutions.

A generator on your property can provide backup power when there is an outage. However, this tends to be terribly cost-ineffective, and it’s not particularly environmentally friendly. On the other hand, solar power is an increasingly popular and accessible choice for homeowners. In essence, you’ll need a solar panel array — either on your roof or somewhere near your property — which is attached to an inverter that turns the energy into usable electricity, which is then distributed through your home using a computerized controller. You can also get a battery backup system to assist in emergencies. While you can install it personally, it can be wise to engage a skilled contractor if you’re not familiar with your house’s electrics.  

While most internet and communications lines are underground, that doesn’t make them impervious to disasters. Your ability to stay in contact with friends, relatives, and emergency services can be vital when a disaster strikes. Therefore it can be sensible to set up alternatives in your home. A spare 5G router can keep you connected to the internet to check for updates and advice. 

Structural Upgrades

If you have the budget for it, it is definitely worth considering which structural upgrades you can make to your home. Over the last few decades, there have been technological advances that can put your home in a better position to withstand a disaster. Some of these are simple and others make for more involved projects.

If you live in an area that is particularly prone to heavy storms, earthquakes, or even wildfires a good example of advanced structural technology is interlocking 3D panels. These are constructed from a combination of materials — concrete, steel, polystyrene — and reinforced by welded wire trusses. As such, this means that the building can withstand high winds and effectively fireproof the home for at least two hours.

However, this requires substantial capital to undertake, and if you are unable to access these funds immediately it can be worth considering refinancing your home to some extent. This is possible even with bad credit, although it can be sensible to repair your credit score first to get a better financing rate. It can seem like a big step, but this could be an important safety feature in your home and even raise its value.

Conclusion

Your home is an important asset to you and your family, and as such you want to protect it and everyone within it from natural disasters. Not all the alterations you make need to be structural overhauls. However, you should guide your actions with a thorough understanding of the risks.